Heating & Cooling

A:

A ceiling fan brace is necessary when it is not possible to mount a ceiling fan directly to the side of a joist. Installing the brace involves cutting through the ceiling drywall to place brace, and it takes less than an hour. The materials required for the task are the brace kit, a tape measure, stud finder, pencil and drywall saw.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • How Is a Thermostat Read?

    Q: How Is a Thermostat Read?

    A: Thermostats vary by design, but digital thermostats typically have both the current temperature and the target temperature. Traditional thermostats generally have a knob or lever attached to a marker that points to the desired temperature.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Does My Pilot Light Keep Going Out?

    Q: Why Does My Pilot Light Keep Going Out?

    A: A pilot light flame stops burning if the thermocouple is damaged or misaligned. The thermocouple is a piece of wire placed near the pilot light flame that detects heat. If no heat is detected, the pilot closes the gas valve to prevent unburned fuel from entering the home.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do I Know If My Air Conditioner Needs Freon?

    Q: How Do I Know If My Air Conditioner Needs Freon?

    A: If an air conditioner is not cooling as well as it once was, it may need Freon. Some signs of this include the air conditioner being turned up to the highest setting, but barely producing any cold air, or cold air not coming out at all. Another sign is if large amounts of water are leaking from the air conditioner's air handler.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Do Air Conditioners Dehumidify?

    Q: Do Air Conditioners Dehumidify?

    A: Air conditioners both cool and dehumidify the air, according to About Home Repair. Cooler air is unable to hold as much moisture as warmer air, making dehumidifying a natural part of the cooling process.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Efficient Is an Electric Heater?

    Q: How Efficient Is an Electric Heater?

    A: Most electric heaters are capable of turning electricity into heat efficiency, but they generally cost more than gas- and oil-powered devices to run. Power plants, most of which are fueled by coal and natural gas, lose energy by converting heat into electricity.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Does a Thermostat Work?

    Q: How Does a Thermostat Work?

    A: Generally speaking, thermostats work by using a mercury switch that is in contact with a thermometer wire to trigger a temperature-adjustment lever in response to the expansion or contraction of the wires as they are heated or cooled. The expansion and contraction of these wires triggers switch relays that control heating and cooling by triggering either a circulation fan and heater or air conditioner.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do You Calculate Air Conditioner Size?

    Q: How Do You Calculate Air Conditioner Size?

    A: Determining the appropriate size for an air conditioner ensures proper and effective function. If the unit is too large, it cools the room but doesn't properly remove humidity, resulting in a damp or clammy feeling. Conversely, a unit that is too small doesn't sufficiently cool the room.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Is the Smoke Detector Going Off When There Is No Smoke?

    Q: Why Is the Smoke Detector Going Off When There Is No Smoke?

    A: A variety of external elements can cause a false alarm from a standard ionization smoke detector. Loss of power, humidity, dust, insects and debris from common household appliances can all cause a false alarm.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Does a Heat Pump System Work?

    Q: How Does a Heat Pump System Work?

    A: Heat pumps use electricity to draw heat from the air or ground outdoors and transfer it inside. As a result, heat pumps are more efficient in temperate regions than in cooler regions.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is an Average Cost of Replacing HVAC?

    Q: What Is an Average Cost of Replacing HVAC?

    A: As of 2014, a building owner can expect to pay between $5,000 and $11,000 to replace the residential HVAC system. The cost of replacing an HVAC system varies greatly. The type of system, installation costs and any necessary changes or modifications to the structure can dramatically affect the cost of replacing the HVAC system.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Long Does Kerosene Last?

    Q: How Long Does Kerosene Last?

    A: Kerosene, when properly stored, has a shelf life of two to five years. Adding a fuel stabilizer once a year should keep the kerosene in good condition indefinitely.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why Won't My Central Heating Work?

    Q: Why Won't My Central Heating Work?

    A: Several different issues cause a central heating system to stop working. For instance, when the power is out, most systems no longer provide heat. Even though a forced air system uses natural gas as fuel, it may require electricity to operate the blower. If too many lights and electronics are on in the house, power overload can trip the electrical circuit breakers and affect the central heating system.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How to Troubleshoot Heating Problems at Home?

    Q: How to Troubleshoot Heating Problems at Home?

    A: Troubleshoot heating problems at home by determining the cause, such as a thermostat merely being set at too low a temperature, by the problem, which is that the furnace does not put out enough heat. The solution is to raise the thermostat settings to a comfortable temperature.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What Is the Difference Between Kerosene and Diesel?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between Kerosene and Diesel?

    A: Kerosene and diesel are made up of long, flammable hydrocarbon molecules derived from crude oil, which is also known as petroleum. Kerosene is made up of a mixture of carbon chains with between six and 16 carbon atoms per chain. Diesel fuels are heavier, with anywhere from eight to 21 carbon atoms per chain. Both are liquid at room temperature, but diesel fuel has a higher boiling point.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do You Repair a Gas Furnace That Won't Start?

    Q: How Do You Repair a Gas Furnace That Won't Start?

    A: A gas furnace that does not start sometimes requires relighting the pilot light. After waiting a few minutes for fumes to clear the area, the owner can turn the dial to pilot, press the red button, and light the pilot. Holding the button down for 30 seconds warms the thermocouple.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Long Does a Furnace Last?

    Q: How Long Does a Furnace Last?

    A: The average furnace lasts 15 to 20 years. This life span is typical of a furnace with a stainless or aluminized steel heat exchanger. In contrast, old furnaces with heavy metal heat exchangers last for 30 to 40 years, but they are less efficient than newer models, prompting many homeowners to replace them even if they still work.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do You Calculate the BTU of an Air Conditioner?

    Q: How Do You Calculate the BTU of an Air Conditioner?

    A: BTU is an abbreviation for British Thermal Unit, which is the international measure of energy. An air conditioner's BTU must be matched to the size of the room for adequate cooling. BTU tables estimate different energy requirements.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do You Size Room Air Conditioners?

    Q: How Do You Size Room Air Conditioners?

    A: Use the area of a room to determine the proper air conditioner size estimate, which is measured in British thermal units per hour. A 100- to 150-square-foot room needs a 5,000 BTU per hour unit, while a 400- to 450-square-foot room needs a 10,000 BTU per hour unit.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Can You Cut Down on Your Electric Bill?

    Q: How Can You Cut Down on Your Electric Bill?

    A: According to the U.S. government's Energy Star website, about half a home's energy bill goes to heating and cooling, so one way to cut down on electric bills is to ensure heating and cooling equipment work efficiently and to seal the house to avoid temperature leakage. Other ways to cut down on electricity include using hot water sparingly, upgrading to energy-efficient appliances and turning off lights when not in use.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Do You Reset a Honeywell Thermostat?

    Q: How Do You Reset a Honeywell Thermostat?

    A: Reset procedures vary widely depending on the model of the Honeywell thermostat, but they include pressing System to reconfigure the settings or temporarily inserting the batteries backwards. Call the Honeywell technical support line or refer to the thermostat's manual for exact reset instruction for a particular model.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How Safe to Use Are Plug-in Wall Heaters?

    Q: How Safe to Use Are Plug-in Wall Heaters?

    A: Plug-in wall heaters raise a range of safety concerns and are not considered safe by default. However, they can be made safe to use if certain precautions are taken.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: