Q:

How did the monkey wrench get its name?

A:

Quick Answer

The term "monkey wrench" dates back to 1807 in Great Britain. Referring to the tool, the phrase appears in E.S. Dane’s "Peter Stubs & Lancashire Hand Tool Industry" catalog, which reads "Fleetwood, Richard...Parr, Rainford. Screw plates, lathes, clock engines...monkey wrenches, taps."

Continue Reading

Full Answer

In 1858, Charles Moncky of Baltimore, Maryland, applied for a patent for the monkey wrench. Some believe the term monkey wrench is a derivation of Mr. Moncky's name, but its use in Great Britain in 1807 negates this assumption.

The phrase "throwing a monkey wrench," meaning the creation of an obstacle, dates to a 1907 article in the Chicago Tribune, which reads: "It should look to them as if he were throwing a monkeywrench..."

Learn more about Tools

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a combination wrench?

    A:

    A combination wrench features a boxed end and an open end. The boxed end features either six or twelve points. There is a slight angle between the shaft and the boxed end, allowing for additional torque in a variety of applications.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you replace the blade on a Delta miter saw?

    A:

    To replace a blade on a Delta miter saw, unscrew the guards from the saw and then use a wrench to unscrew the bolt holding the blade while holding the bolt in place on the other side with an Allen wrench. Remove the old blade and screw in the bolt around the new blade.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How does a ratchet wrench work?

    A:

    A ratchet wrench makes use of a gear and pawl mechanism to maintain force when spun in a single direction while releasing in the opposite direction. Ratchet wrenches are also commonly called socket wrenches.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a box-end wrench?

    A:

    A box-end wrench is a single-piece wrench with enclosed circular openings at each end of the handle. The enclosed ends grip round or square nut and bolt faces with six, eight or 12 inner prongs, called points.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore