Q:

How do you care for an orange star plant?

A:

Quick Answer

Orange star plants are hardy in U.S. Department of Agriculture planting zones 7 through 11. Orange stars can be grown indoors if temperatures are too cold for successful winterizing. Watering and pruning are important to maintain healthy plants.

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Full Answer

  1. Plant the orange star in well-drained soil

    Orange stars prefer soil that is moist and drains well. Plant the orange star in a raised bed, rock garden or sandy soil 3 inches deep and 3 to 6 inches apart.

  2. Remove harmful pests and spray for fungal diseases

    Closed buds and leaves are prey to thrip. Many thrips hide on the underside of leaves and cause discoloration or leave tiny black dots. Prune affected stems and leaves, and spray with a strong stream of water to remove any remaining thrips. Orange star flowers are vulnerable to fungal diseases. If rusty brown spots appear on the plant, spray with a fungicide approved for ornamental plants.

  3. Prune spent flowers and foliage

    As flowers die back, remove them to improve the appearance of the plant and to make room for new buds. When the foliage turns yellow, prune it to the ground in preparation for the next growing season.

  4. Remove bulbs in winter

    If the soil doesn't drain well, remove the bulbs in winter to prevent root rot. Store roots in a mesh bag in a dry, well-ventilated location.

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