Q:

How do people celebrate the new year around the world?

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Quick Answer

The new year is celebrated in many different ways around the world, but one tradition that is generally accepted almost everywhere is to stay up the night before until midnight to welcome the New Year. In the US, it is customary at the stroke of midnight to kiss your loved ones, have a champagne toast and make personal resolutions for the upcoming year.

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How do people celebrate the new year around the world?
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Full Answer

While most cultures recognize January 1st as New Year's Day, some countries follow a different calendar. The Chinese New Year, for example, is aligned with the lunar cycle. It is a 15-day celebration marked by parades, festivals and long-held traditions. The Jewish people follow the Hebrew calendar, so their new year starts with Rosh Hashanah and ends with Yom Kippur. This 10-day period is a time of atonement. In Thailand, the New Year is celebrated in mid-April with a 3-day festival where people release fish into the rivers to indicate kindness.

In Belgium, children write letters to parents and godparents, and onions hang on the doors of the people in Greece as a symbol of rebirth. In Denmark, the people eat a cake called Kransekage, and they throw dishes on other people's doorsteps to ensure that they have many friends during the upcoming year. Bells ring 108 times at Buddhist temples in Japan, while Estonians eat up to twelve meals that is said to give the them strength.

While most cultures recognize January 1st as New Year's Day, some countries follow a different calendar. The Chinese New Year, for example, is aligned with the lunar cycle. It is a 15-day celebration marked by parades, festivals and long-held traditions. The Jewish people follow the Hebrew calendar, so their new year starts with Rosh Hashanah and ends with Yom Kippur. This 10-day period is a time of atonement. In Thailand, the New Year is celebrated in mid-April with a 3-day festival where people release fish into the rivers to indicate kindness.

In Belgium, children write letters to parents and godparents, and onions hang on the doors of the people in Greece as a symbol of rebirth. In Denmark, the people eat a cake called Kransekage, and they throw dishes on other people's doorsteps to ensure that they have many friends during the upcoming year. Bells ring 108 times at Buddhist temples in Japan, while Estonians eat up to twelve meals that is said to give the them strength.

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