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What are some tips on bidding in bridge?

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Quick Answer

When to open bidding and supporting a partner's bid are important aspects of the game. For instance, if a hand has more than 12 high card points, it's good to open bidding, states For Dummies.

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Full Answer

In bridge, aces are worth four points, kings three, queens two and jacks one. Each player gets 13 cards. One tip for bidding is to count up the number of points in the opening hand and only bid with 12 or more points.

During the game, the goal is for each player to bid the tricks he thinks he can take. A player can make a bid from seven up to the entire 13 tricks if desired. The highest card played in the same suit wins the trick. A player should only bid if he has at least three high-ranking cards in a suit, though five is better.

When supporting a partner's bid, again a player should only bid if he has three high-ranking cards in that suit. When his partner bids, a player should pass if he has fewer than six points in that suit.

When opening the bidding in a new suit, a player should ensure he has five cards in that suit. If he has two five-card suits, he should open with the higher ranked suit, suggests For Dummies.

Bridge is played with a partner, and players need to make assumptions based on their partner's play. If the partner opens a bid and declares a trump, a player should assume the above minimum requirements have been met. One option is to support the partner's suit. This should only be done with a minimum of eight points in that suit. Another option is to open another suit, though this requires a minimum of eight points in the alternate suit.

The major suits are hearts and spades, while the minor suits are diamonds and clubs. If a player has two four-card suits, that player should open in the minor suit. If both four-card suits are minor, the player should bid on diamonds, which is the higher of the two minors. Spades is the higher major suit, so the player should bid on that suit first.

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