Q:

What is the thickness of a quarter?

A:

Quick Answer

The United States quarter is one-sixteenth of an inch thick and weighs 0.2 ounces, according to the U.S. Mint. The obverse (heads) bears the image of President George Washington, while the reverse (tails) depicts alternate designs of national parks and sites. Prior to 1999, the reverse featured an eagle.

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Full Answer

The quarter was designed by John Flanagan in 1932 to commemorate the 200th anniversary of President Washington's birth. It was initially circulated as a commemorative coin but was made regular issue in 1934. Since 2010, the U.S. Mint began issuing quarters depicting national parks and sites as part of the America the Beautiful Quarters Program.

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