Coins & Currency

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The Martin Van Buren presidential $1 coin is dedicated to the eighth U.S. president. It is part of the Presidential $1 Coin Program, part of an Act of Congress from 2005, directing the United States Mint to produce a collection of $1 coins with relief portraits of each of the U.S. presidents.

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  • What are the edges on a coin called?

    Q: What are the edges on a coin called?

    A: The third side of a coin is called the edge. The edge runs the entire circumference of the coin between the heads side, call the obverse, and the tails side, called the reverse. It is literally the third side of the coin.
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  • Why is Alexander Hamilton on the $10 bill?

    Q: Why is Alexander Hamilton on the $10 bill?

    A: Alexander Hamilton is on the $10 bill because he was the first Secretary of the Treasury. His proactive stance in running the Treasury Department set many precedents for its role in government. With Benjamin Franklin, he is one of two non-Presidents on U.S. bills.
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  • What do you call a coin collector?

    Q: What do you call a coin collector?

    A: A numismatist is a person who collects coins. Coin collectors value a coin based primarily on its date, condition and place of origin. Coins that contain production errors also carry a high value for collectors.
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  • When did the U.S. Mint stop making pure silver coins?

    Q: When did the U.S. Mint stop making pure silver coins?

    A: The U.S. Mint never made "pure" silver coins because 99.9 percent silver is too soft to use in circulation. Dimes, quarters and half dollars were minted with 90 percent silver content through 1964.
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  • How do you identify an old coin?

    Q: How do you identify an old coin?

    A: You can identify all but the most worn old coins by comparing their characteristics to images and attribute listings of old U.S. coins. Coins vary by size, weight, color, edging, engraving and composition. Isolating the key attributes can help you identify the coin.
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  • What is the volume of a quarter?

    Q: What is the volume of a quarter?

    A: The volume of a quarter is 808.53 mm3. A quarter is a cylinder with a diameter of 24.26 mm and a thickness, or height, of 1.75 mm. The volume of a cylinder is found by taking the radius of the cylinder squared times the height of the cylinder times pi.
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  • How do you identify Arabic silver coins?

    Q: How do you identify Arabic silver coins?

    A: Identifying any foreign coin is largely a matter of learning as much as possible about the coin from its markings, metal composition, country of origin and age. Many conversion tables are available online, once this information has been gathered, to translate dates and originator information. Sometimes this is difficult, as dates on Arabic coins are read right-to-left, according to the World Coin Gallery.
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  • What is a plug nickel?

    Q: What is a plug nickel?

    A: According to The Phrase Finder, a plugged coin is one that has had part of it removed and then filled with a lower quality metal. Because nickels are already not worth much, a plugged nickel is completely worthless.
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  • Who is on the $50 bill?

    Q: Who is on the $50 bill?

    A: The portrait on the $50 bill is of Ulysses S. Grant. He was the commanding general of the Union Army and was later elected as the 18th president of the United States.
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  • What is a Martin Van Buren dollar coin?

    Q: What is a Martin Van Buren dollar coin?

    A: The Martin Van Buren presidential $1 coin is dedicated to the eighth U.S. president. It is part of the Presidential $1 Coin Program, part of an Act of Congress from 2005, directing the United States Mint to produce a collection of $1 coins with relief portraits of each of the U.S. presidents.
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  • When did they stop making copper pennies?

    Q: When did they stop making copper pennies?

    A: Pennies in the United States were made of pure copper from 1793 to 1837, and then contained varying amounts of copper throughout the years before converting to a majority 97.5 percent zinc in 1982. At that point, the penny continued to be made with a small 2.5 percent copper.
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  • Do old $100 bills have watermarks?

    Q: Do old $100 bills have watermarks?

    A: Watermarks were introduced to the $100 bill in 1996. Better printing technology also enabled many other changes and extra security measures not seen in previous years.
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  • Ho do you clean silver coins?

    Q: Ho do you clean silver coins?

    A: Silver coins can be cleaned by dipping the coins in lemon juice for a certain amount of time and then cleaning them with a soft brush. Afterwards, the coins should be washed using water and then dried off.
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  • What is a dime made out of?

    Q: What is a dime made out of?

    A: As of 2014, the dime is made out of a blend of metals called "clad." A copper center is sandwiched between two layers of a 75-percent copper and 25-percent nickel blend. The total composition of a modern dime is 91.67 percent copper and 8.33 percent nickel.
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  • What is the best way to clean old coins?

    Q: What is the best way to clean old coins?

    A: According to coin expert Susan Headley for About, the easiest process for cleaning old coins is to gently rinse the coins in a bath of warm tap water and mild dish-washing detergent. It is important to make sure that the hands are thoroughly washed to remove all surface oils and dirt that may potentially contaminate the coins. Headley stresses that cleaning old coins is not recommended unless absolutely necessary.
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  • What is a pence?

    Q: What is a pence?

    A: A pence is a piece of currency from the United Kingdom that bears some similarity to the penny in the United States, in that 100 pence is equal to 1 pound. Before the decimalization of the U.K. monetary system in 1971, 12 pence were equal to 1 pound.
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  • How many nickels equal a dime?

    Q: How many nickels equal a dime?

    A: Two nickels, which are worth 5 U.S. cents each, equal one dime, which is worth 10 U.S. cents. The diameter of a nickel is 0.835 inches with a width of 1.96 millimeters, while a dime is smaller, at 0.705 inches in diameter and 1.35 millimeters in thickness.
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  • What is the length and width of a dollar bill?

    Q: What is the length and width of a dollar bill?

    A: The length of a dollar bill is 6.14 inches, and the width is 2.61 inches. If one million dollar bills laid end to end lengthwise, they would extend 96.6 miles. One trillion dollar bills would extend 96,906,656 miles, which is farther than the distance to the sun.
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  • What is on an Australian 50-cent coin?

    Q: What is on an Australian 50-cent coin?

    A: The front of the Australian 50-cent coin features the profile of Elizabeth II. The back has gone through a number of design changes since first being introduced in 1966. As of 2014, the design features the logo of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies.
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  • What is the value of a farthing?

    Q: What is the value of a farthing?

    A: A farthing was a coin in the old monetary system of the United Kingdom that was worth one-fourth of a penny. It took 960 farthings to make up a pound sterling. Monetary inflation rendered the farthing virtually worthless by the 1950s, and it was removed from circulation in 1960.
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  • What is the strongest currency?

    Q: What is the strongest currency?

    A: As of May 2014, the strongest currency in the world is the Kuwaiti dinar. In relation to U.S. dollars, 1 Kuwaiti equals $2.847. Kuwait is located on the Arabian Peninsula, contains the fifth largest oil reserve in the world and is often ranked among the top ten richest countries.
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