Coins & Currency

A:

Benjamin Franklin appeared on the half-dollar coin before John F. Kennedy. An woman symbolizing liberty was on the face of the half-dollar coin before Franklin.

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  • What is a Martin Van Buren dollar coin?

    Q: What is a Martin Van Buren dollar coin?

    A: The Martin Van Buren presidential $1 coin is dedicated to the eighth U.S. president. It is part of the Presidential $1 Coin Program, part of an Act of Congress from 2005, directing the United States Mint to produce a collection of $1 coins with relief portraits of each of the U.S. presidents.
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  • What is the James Madison dollar coin?

    Q: What is the James Madison dollar coin?

    A: The James Madison dollar is part of the Presidential $1 coin collection produced by the U.S. Mint. The U.S. Mint rolled out the program to honor the U.S. Presidents, issuing four new coins a year in the order the presidents served.
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  • What is the value of a farthing?

    Q: What is the value of a farthing?

    A: A farthing was a coin in the old monetary system of the United Kingdom that was worth one-fourth of a penny. It took 960 farthings to make up a pound sterling. Monetary inflation rendered the farthing virtually worthless by the 1950s, and it was removed from circulation in 1960.
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  • How do you identify a worn coin?

    Q: How do you identify a worn coin?

    A: To identify a worn coin, use a magnifying glass and a bright light to check the coin for signs of wear. Signs of wear include smooth rims, high points that are worn flat and print on the coin that is difficult to read. You need a magnifying glass with a power of up to 3x, a bright light, gloves and a soft surface to place the coins on.
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  • What is on an Australian 50-cent coin?

    Q: What is on an Australian 50-cent coin?

    A: The front of the Australian 50-cent coin features the profile of Elizabeth II. The back has gone through a number of design changes since first being introduced in 1966. As of 2014, the design features the logo of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies.
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  • What is a dime made out of?

    Q: What is a dime made out of?

    A: As of 2014, the dime is made out of a blend of metals called "clad." A copper center is sandwiched between two layers of a 75-percent copper and 25-percent nickel blend. The total composition of a modern dime is 91.67 percent copper and 8.33 percent nickel.
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  • What is the purpose of a watermark?

    Q: What is the purpose of a watermark?

    A: A watermark protects digital intellectual property, such as photos and artwork, from unauthorized use. It identifies the rightful owner of the work, which discourages other people from using it as their own.
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  • What is the best way to clean old coins?

    Q: What is the best way to clean old coins?

    A: According to coin expert Susan Headley for About, the easiest process for cleaning old coins is to gently rinse the coins in a bath of warm tap water and mild dish-washing detergent. It is important to make sure that the hands are thoroughly washed to remove all surface oils and dirt that may potentially contaminate the coins. Headley stresses that cleaning old coins is not recommended unless absolutely necessary.
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  • Where can you sell old coins?

    Q: Where can you sell old coins?

    A: Collectors most often buy and sell old coins at auctions, from coin dealers and at coin collecting conventions. Coin valuation companies offer a third-party estimated value for both coin buyers and sellers.
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  • What is a pence?

    Q: What is a pence?

    A: A pence is a piece of currency from the United Kingdom that bears some similarity to the penny in the United States, in that 100 pence is equal to 1 pound. Before the decimalization of the U.K. monetary system in 1971, 12 pence were equal to 1 pound.
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  • What is the volume of a quarter?

    Q: What is the volume of a quarter?

    A: The volume of a quarter is 808.53 mm3. A quarter is a cylinder with a diameter of 24.26 mm and a thickness, or height, of 1.75 mm. The volume of a cylinder is found by taking the radius of the cylinder squared times the height of the cylinder times pi.
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  • What are the edges on a coin called?

    Q: What are the edges on a coin called?

    A: The third side of a coin is called the edge. The edge runs the entire circumference of the coin between the heads side, call the obverse, and the tails side, called the reverse. It is literally the third side of the coin.
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  • When did they stop making copper pennies?

    Q: When did they stop making copper pennies?

    A: Pennies in the United States were made of pure copper from 1793 to 1837, and then contained varying amounts of copper throughout the years before converting to a majority 97.5 percent zinc in 1982. At that point, the penny continued to be made with a small 2.5 percent copper.
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  • What year did the mint stop producing silver coins?

    Q: What year did the mint stop producing silver coins?

    A: Silver dollars were discontinued in 1935. Half dollars, quarters and dimes were minted with a 90% silver alloy through 1964. While quarters and dimes went to a copper-nickel clad composition, half dollars used a 40% silver alloy through 1970.
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  • What are the Elizabeth II coins?

    Q: What are the Elizabeth II coins?

    A: Elizabeth II coins are coins carrying the head of Queen Elizabeth II on them. All British coins and the majority of the 53 member countries of the Commonwealth carry the head of Queen Elizabeth II on the obverse side of the coin.
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  • How do you price old coins?

    Q: How do you price old coins?

    A: The price of old coins is determined by collector demand, according to the American Numismatic Association. Demand changes from year to year as collectors alter their buying and selling habits. The ANA states promoters, dealers and the U.S. Mint influence prices of coins on a regular basis.
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  • How much does one penny weigh?

    Q: How much does one penny weigh?

    A: United States pennies minted after 1982 weigh 2.5 grams, or 0.088 ounces. These pennies are 2.5 percent copper and 97.5 percent zinc. Before 1982, pennies weighed 3.11 grams, or 0.110 ounces. They were 95 percent copper and 5 percent zinc, which is a form of bronze.
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  • How many nickels equal a dime?

    Q: How many nickels equal a dime?

    A: Two nickels, which are worth 5 U.S. cents each, equal one dime, which is worth 10 U.S. cents. The diameter of a nickel is 0.835 inches with a width of 1.96 millimeters, while a dime is smaller, at 0.705 inches in diameter and 1.35 millimeters in thickness.
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  • What is 950 silver?

    Q: What is 950 silver?

    A: Jewelry marked as 950 silver means that the item is 95 percent pure silver. When stamped 950, it refers to its purity in parts per thousand. The remaining 5 percent is an alloy added to increase the hardness of the silver piece.
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  • What was ancient Roman money called?

    Q: What was ancient Roman money called?

    A: The earliest Roman currency was a bronze coin called the as. It weighed as much as a Roman pound, about 335.9 grams. Around 187 B.C. a silver coin called the denarius was introduced. During the Second Punic War (218 to 201 B.C.), a gold coin called the aureus was introduced.
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  • How do you identify Arabic silver coins?

    Q: How do you identify Arabic silver coins?

    A: Identifying any foreign coin is largely a matter of learning as much as possible about the coin from its markings, metal composition, country of origin and age. Many conversion tables are available online, once this information has been gathered, to translate dates and originator information. Sometimes this is difficult, as dates on Arabic coins are read right-to-left, according to the World Coin Gallery.
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