Q:

What is the most-collected Corelle pattern?

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Quick Answer

The most-collected Corelle dinnerware pattern is Winter Frost White, first introduced in 1970. Corelle sold more than 40 million pieces of the design within 18 months of its introduction. Winter Frost White is a pure white design in a coupe-shape that is slightly concave with no rim.

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Full Answer

Following Winter Frost White in popularity is the Country Cottage pattern, which has a floral and heart motif in light green and light blue and was introduced in 1995. Next in line is Simple Lines, a black-and-white swirl pattern on a squared plate shape introduced in 2006; City Block, a geometric black-and-white pattern also introduced in 2006; and Splendor, a red-and-gray pattern which made its debut in 2011.

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