Q:

Who won the war between Athens and Sparta?

A:

Quick Answer

The Greek city-state of Sparta won the war against Athens. The war, known as the Peloponnesian War, raged for 27 years between the Athenian realm and the Peloponnesian coalition commanded by the Spartans.

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Full Answer

The Peloponnesian War began in 431 B.C.C. and ended in 404 B.C.E. when Athens conceded defeat to Sparta. The rapid rise of Athens as a dominant city-state in ancient Greece threatened the Spartans and triggered the onset of war. The Peloponnesian War was split into three stages: the Archidamian War, the Sicilian War and the Ionian or Decelean War. The war's first 20 years was covered by the Greek historian, Thucydides, and was later resumed by Xenophon.

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Related Questions

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    What are the differences between Athens and Sparta?

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    The primary difference between Sparta and Athens is their differing systems of government. Sparta is considered an oligarchy, meaning ruled by the few, while Athens is believed by historians to have been a democracy. The ancient Greek word "oligos" translates as "few," and "archia" translates as "rule." Thus, the "rule by the few" is what distinguishes Sparta from Athens.

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  • Q:

    What are some facts about Sparta?

    A:

    Sparta was a city-state on the banks of the Eurotas River and lasted from about 900 to 192 B.C. Around 650 B.C., Sparta was considered the dominant military-land power in Greece.

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  • Q:

    Why was Sparta better than Athens?

    A:

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  • Q:

    What were the two most powerful city-states in early Greece?

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