Q:

What was the significance of the Second Battle of the Marne?

A:

Quick Answer

The Second Battle of the Marne was the last major German offensive on the Western Front of World War I. The Allied victory is considered the turning point of the war. It marked the beginning of the counter-offensive which culminated in Germany's surrender three months later.

Continue Reading
What was the significance of the Second Battle of the Marne?
Credit: Interim Archives Archive Photos Getty Images

Full Answer

The battle took place from July 15 to Aug. 5, 1918. German general Erich Ludendorff believed that Germany could win the war with one final push on France. His plan was to make a diversionary attack along the Marne river to draw out the British Expeditionary Force and split the French Army in two.

The British and French were reinforced with soldiers from the United States, which had entered the war in 1917. Several American military units established enduring legends for their service in the battle: the Third Infantry Division earned the nickname "The Rock of the Marne," and the Marines were given the nickname "Devil Dogs" by the Germans for their valor at Belleau Wood.

After the German failure to break through the Allied lines, the Allies began a counter-offensive on July 18 and continued through Aug. 5. For the next three months, the exhausted Germans were gradually pushed back through the gains they had made since the war began. They surrendered in November of 1918.

Learn more about World War 1

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the Zimmermann Note?

    A:

    Sent in 1917, the Zimmermann Telegram was a confidential message from Germany to Mexico promising Mexico territory in the United States if Mexico aided Germany should the United States enter World War I. The telegram convinced the American public to support the American troop deployment into the war effort.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What rifles were used in World War I?

    A:

    According to firstworldwar.com, dozens of different types of rifles were put into service during World War I. However, many of these weapons had a relatively small distribution. Throughout the course of the war, most of the major armies relied on a handful of trusted rifles made by German, French, British and American manufacturers. These rifles can be divided into long-barrel types and short-barrel carbines.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who won World War I?

    A:

    The Allies won World War I. The primary members of the Allies were the British Empire, France, Italy (after 1915) and the Russian Empire, although Russia pulled out before the end of the war. Japan, Greece, Belgium, Serbia, Montenegro, Romania and several other nations contributed to the Allied cause. The United States fought alongside Allied troops but never formally entered the alliance.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What was the cause of World War I?

    A:

    Although the assassination of Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand is cited as the main cause that thrust the world into war, many causes and events led up to World War I. Some of the secondary causes include the mutual defense alliances in place at the time, nationalism, imperialism and militarism.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore