Q:

What is the meaning of D-day?

A:

Quick Answer

The United States military uses the term D-day as a start date for field operations. There are many D-day dates in history but the most famous is the one that occurred on June 6, 1944.

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Full Answer

Another code word for the beginning of an operation by the armed forces is H-hour. These two terms began to be in popular use during World War I.

The most famous D-day occurred in 1944. Operation Overload is another name for the event. This D-day began what was to result in the Allied liberation of Western Europe from Nazi control. The Battle of Normandy is also a name for the event.

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