Q:

Who made the first kite?

A:

Quick Answer

Although it's unclear who specifically made the first kite, the earliest recorded reference to kites comes in the work of Chinese philosopher Mozi, who lived around 470-391 BCE. An early prototype design for a wooden kite appears in a Mozi text.

Continue Reading
Who made the first kite?
Credit: Aleksander Rubtsov Blend Images Getty Images

Full Answer

According to China Highlights, Mozi's kite prototype was preserved and passed down by another contemporary philosopher, Lu Ban. These earliest kites were built of light wood and formed in the shape of a bird. These kites typically served military purposes, such as sending distress signals to neighboring towns. It wasn't until nearly one thousand years later that kites built of paper and silk began to appear. These lighter kites were the first to transcend their military origins and serve as leisure items.

Learn more about Inventions

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How does a telegram work?

    A:

    A telegram is a message sent through electrical signals fed through a wire. Most telegrams use Morse code to transmit and receive signals through the wire.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where did Galileo do his work?

    A:

    Galileo Galilei was an Italian astronomer and physicist who worked as a lecturer in 1589 at the University of Pisa. From 1592 to 1610, he worked at the University of Padua.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do machines make work easier?

    A:

    Machines make work easier by changing the force on an object. Work occurs when an individual applies force to an object, and when a machine is used, the machine applies the force to the object instead of the individual.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How does the telegraph work?

    A:

    Telegraph keys are switches in electrical circuits that power on the current. When the operator taps out the signals for a word, the switch finishes a circuit, permitting electricity to continue around it. At the other end of the line, the recipient watches a pointer or dial indicating the different patterns of code, listens to a buzzer or reads the print out from a device.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore