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What are some facts about Iraq War fatalities?

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Quick Answer

Of the 4,487 U.S. troops who died during the Iraq War, 98 percent were male, 91 percent were non-officers and 82 percent were on active duty. Eleven percent were National Guard fatalities, 74 percent were Caucasian, 9 percent were African-American, and 11 percent were Latino. The Iraq War started in 2003 with the U.S. invasion of Iraq and ended in 2011 with the U.S. withdrawal of troops.

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Full Answer

Nineteen percent of U.S. troops who perished during the Iraq War died from non-hostile causes, 54 percent were below the age of 25, and 72 percent were from the U.S. Army. A total of 32,223 U.S. troops were wounded in the war, and 20 percent of these troops sustained serious brain or spinal cord damage. About 30 percent of troops who returned to the United States developed posttraumatic stress disorder and other serious mental health problems within three to four months of their return.

Iraqi military casualties far exceeded those of the United States, and more than 10,000 Iraqi police officers and soldiers are reported to have died. An ABC News report in 2010 of a U.S. government tally pegged Iraqi civilian casualties at more than 100,000, while informed estimates place the number closer to 600,000. However, an Opinion Research Business survey placed Iraqi civilian deaths up to 2007 at more than 1 million.

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