Q:

Who was the inventor of the first television?

A:

Quick Answer

The inventor of the first television was Paul Gottlieb Nipkow. Paul Nipkow was a German student at the time of this invention. The invention of the first electric-mechanical television occurred in 1884.

Continue Reading
Who was the inventor of the first television?
Credit: DarkShadow Moment Getty Images

Full Answer

Some changes were made to the original design over the next 50 years. The first event of broadcast television in the United States occurred in 1928 in a suburb of Washington, DC. The broadcast was compiled of images shown only in silhouette.

The first instance of regularly scheduled programming for broadcast television began in the United States in 1931. This seven day a week programming schedule was broadcast by CBS out of New York.

Learn more about Inventions
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Who invented the first hair comb?

    A:

    The comb is such a basic human tool that historians have no way to know who the inventor of the first comb was. Combs that have been found by archaeologists have been located in settlements from 5,000 years ago in Persia.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    When was the TV invented?

    A:

    The invention of TV was a gradual process starting as early as the 1820s, but it was not until 1927 that Philo Farnsworth produced the first television picture. Even so, David Sarnoff of RCA is remembered as the father of television because he was first to market it.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who made the first television?

    A:

    Philo T. Farnsworth made the first television and transmitted the first image, which was a dollar sign made up of 60 individual lines. Farnsworth filed for a patent on his work in 1927.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who invented the nail clipper?

    A:

    Although the inventor of the nail clipper is unknown, the device first surfaced in the late 19th century. The first versions looked like overweight tweezers and were operated by squeezing, and the design hasn't changed much since then.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore