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Who invented dominoes?

A:

Quick Answer

It is not definite as to who invented dominoes, but it is likely that dominoes were invented in China during the 12th century. However, it is possible that they were first invented in Egypt, as there is a set of dominoes that was found in King Tutankhamen's tomb.

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Full Answer

The set of dominoes found in Egypt dates back to around 1355 B.C., and the oldest set found in China dates back to around A.D. 1120. It is possible that dominoes were invented independently in both Egypt and China. The Chinese have many different accounts about how dominoes were invented, but they are only legends.

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