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What is the importance of the Nuremberg trials?

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Quick Answer

The United Nations Genocide Convention and The Geneva Convention on the Laws and Customs of War were formed as a result of the Nuremberg trials, explains The History Channel. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights also emerged as a result of the trials.

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The Nuremberg trials were a series of hearings that began in October 1945 with 22 people who were believed to be high-ranking members of the Nazi Party during World War II initially charged with war crimes and crimes against humanity. The trials were very controversial at the time, as they marked the first time in history anyone was held legally accountable on an international level for such crimes. Over the course of a year, arguments were heard by the International Military Tribunal, a committee comprised primarily of members of the allied nations. Of the initial 22 people charged with Nazi war crimes, only three were acquitted. Twelve were sentenced to hang. The remainder were sent to prison. Between 1946 and 1949, 185 more people were charged with war crimes and crimes against humanity. Of those 185 people, none were acquitted, eight were given death sentences, and the remainder were sent to prison for varying term lengths up to and including life.

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    What was the purpose of the Nuremberg Trials?

    A:

    The purpose of the Nuremburg trials, held in Nuremburg, Germany between 1945 and 1949, was to prosecute Nazi war criminals after World War II. The International Military Tribune that conducted the trails consisted of judges from each of the main Allied powers: the United States, Great Britain, France and the Soviet Union.

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    What were Adolf Hitler's effects on history?

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    Adolf Hitler was a German politician and leader of the Nazi party, explains The History Channel. He started World War II after his attack on Poland in 1939. His Jewish concentration camps resulted in the death of over six million people during the Holocaust.

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    Who were the Allies in World War 2?

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    The most significant Allied countries in World War II were Great Britain and the Commonwealth, France, the Soviet Union, the United States and China, though, in formal terms, the Allies included all wartime members of the United Nations and all the original signatories of their declaration. The Allied coalition was united militarily against the primary Axis forces of Germany, Italy and Japan.

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    What were some of the long-term effects of World War II?

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    Some of the long-term effects of World War II were the division of Germany into two separate states, the destruction of numerous European and Asian cities, a major realignment of political power into Western and Soviet factions, the creation of the United Nations, a strengthening of corporate power and the beginning of a period of increased prosperity in the United States. Two key results of World War II were the formalization of post-war alliances through NATO and the Warsaw Pact, and the beginning of a nuclear arms race between the two factions. In the Middle East, the partition plan for Palestine formulated by the United Nations led to the creation of the state of Israel and a heightening of the conflict with neighboring Arab countries.

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