Q:

What is a good propaganda slogan for World War I?

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Quick Answer

One propaganda slogan intended to recruit soldiers during World War I was, "Don't read American history – make it!" Another good example was, "A wonderful opportunity for you – the United States Navy."

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Full Answer

Some propaganda slogans were intended for all Americans, such as, "Wake up, America! Civilization calls every man, woman and child!" People working in war factories were told, "Rivets are bayonets – drive them home!" Women on the homefront were encouraged with slogans such as, "Our boys need sox; knit your bit."

Other propaganda slogans during World War I highlighted the plight of the civilians caught in the fighting. This included slogans such as, "Must children die and mothers plead in vain? Buy more Liberty Bonds." The efforts of soldiers were emphasized using the slogan, "For you – they are giving their lives over there. For them – you must give every cent you can spare."

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    What age were soldiers in Word War I?

    A:

    While the official ages to serve in all of the countries in World War 1 ranged from about 17-45 years old, records indicate that some soldiers serving in the British army were as young as 12 years old.

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    What equipment was common during World War I?

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    What was life like for soldiers in World War I?

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    What clothing did soldiers wear in World War I?

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