US History

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America's founding ideals are democracy, rights, liberty, opportunity and equality, according to The Founding Ideals of America website. While many of the finer points of American ideals are debated, it is generally agreed that the importance of these five ideals cannot be understated in terms of importance to American society.

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  • Where Is Albert Einstein Buried?

    Q: Where Is Albert Einstein Buried?

    A: Albert Einstein was not buried; he was cremated, and the location of his ashes is unknown. Einstein died in 1955 at a New Jersey hospital at the age of 76. The cause was internal bleeding, stemming from a burst aneurysm.
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  • What Are Some Interesting Facts About Independence Hall?

    Q: What Are Some Interesting Facts About Independence Hall?

    A: Independence Hall, once known as the Old State House, took 21 years to build after ground was first broken on the project in 1732. This is because the provincial government paid for it little by little. The planning and construction were also contentious, as the committee members responsible for the hall often disagreed.
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  • What Did Betsy Ross Do in the Revolutionary War?

    Q: What Did Betsy Ross Do in the Revolutionary War?

    A: Betsy Ross sewed flags during the Revolutionary War. Although it is rumored that she sewed the first American flag at the request of George Washington during that time, there is no historical evidence to substantiate the claim.
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  • What Are Examples of Prejudice in School?

    Q: What Are Examples of Prejudice in School?

    A: Examples of prejudice in schools include excluding students from activities and social groups due to religious beliefs, race, gender or sexual orientation; judging others based on stereotypes; and bullying students due to academic performance or beliefs. Prejudice often leads to discrimination and can drastically affect a person's well being.
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  • What Are Some Interesting Facts About JFK?

    Q: What Are Some Interesting Facts About JFK?

    A: John Fitzgerald Kennedy had long-standing health problems due to a rare disorder called Addison's Disease. Because of this, he was often certain that death was imminent, and he had his last rites read to him by a priest on three separate occasions when he was feeling severely ill.
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  • How Cold Was the Water the Night the Titanic Sank?

    Q: How Cold Was the Water the Night the Titanic Sank?

    A: On the night the Titanic sank, the recorded water temperature in the North Atlantic was registered at 28 degrees Fahrenheit. Water temperatures between 32 and 40 degrees Fahrenheit cause hypothermia, reducing body temperature below 95 degrees Fahrenheit. Hypothermia results in death within 30 to 90 minutes.
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  • What Is the White House Made Of?

    Q: What Is the White House Made Of?

    A: The White House's exterior walls are made of white painted Aquia Creek sandstone that was quarried by slaves. This is the same stone that was used to build the Capitol building.
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  • What Was the Boston Massacre?

    Q: What Was the Boston Massacre?

    A: The Boston Massacre was the killing of five colonial citizens by British troops on March 5, 1770. A mob was protesting new Parliamentary regulations, and several members began throwing sticks and rocks at the British soldiers attempting to restore order. Acting without orders, several of the soldiers fired into the crowd, killing three and wounding eight. Two later died of their injuries, bringing the death toll to five.
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  • How Long Did the Gettysburg Address Last?

    Q: How Long Did the Gettysburg Address Last?

    A: Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address in under 2 minutes. It contained just 272 words. The speech honored the soldiers who died at the battle and called for renewed dedication to winning the Civil War and restoring the Union.
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  • What Was the Outcome and Controversy Over the 1824 Election?

    Q: What Was the Outcome and Controversy Over the 1824 Election?

    A: The presidential election of 1824 led to the election of John Quincy Adams as the President of the United States, but it also raised concerns over corrupt bargaining. According to votes accumulated by the Electoral College, presidential candidate Andrew Jackson was the first-place winner, securing 99 votes and taking a lead, albeit narrow, over Adams. Determining the race too close to call, Henry Clay, speaker of the House of Representatives, was tasked with selecting a winner; his decision to seat Adams in the White House sparked concerns of corruption and favoritism and was met with criticism and outrage.
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  • Where Did New Jersey's Name Come From?

    Q: Where Did New Jersey's Name Come From?

    A: New Jersey got its name from the island of Jersey in the English Channel. It was one of the original 13 English Colonies and became the third state to ratify the United States Constitution in 1787.
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  • What Was the Battle of Trenton?

    Q: What Was the Battle of Trenton?

    A: The Battle of Trenton on December 26, 1776, was a daring and successful attempt by General George Washington to bolster the morale of his troops by defeating a garrison of Hessian mercenaries at Trenton, New Jersey. According to History.com, though it was a small battle, it significantly inspired and unified the Continental Army and proved it could be an effective fighting force.
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  • What Precedents Were Set by George Washington?

    Q: What Precedents Were Set by George Washington?

    A: George Washington is best known for setting the precedent of a two-term limit for American presidents, but he created other patterns later presidents followed as well. For example, he carefully organized his day so he could fulfill all the roles he had as President, and he created the precedent for presidents governing from an office at their homes as well as from the White House.
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  • How Did Thomas Jefferson Feel About the New Constitution?

    Q: How Did Thomas Jefferson Feel About the New Constitution?

    A: The new Constitution of the United States of America, drafted in September of 1787 and finally ratified by all 13 states in 1790, was met with substantial approval from Thomas Jefferson. He did, however, disagree about a number of issues, many of which were handled by later amendments.
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  • How Did "Manifest Destiny" Affect Native Americans?

    Q: How Did "Manifest Destiny" Affect Native Americans?

    A: The term "Manifest Destiny" was first used in 1845 to reference the widespread belief that enterprising pioneers had a divine right to expand from the east coast to the west coast of the continental United States. Native American tribes impeding this grand destiny had to be addressed.
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  • What Does the Proclamation of Neutrality State?

    Q: What Does the Proclamation of Neutrality State?

    A: The Proclamation of Neutrality asserted the U.S.'s position of neutrality with regards to the conflict between England and France. It was issued by George Washington in 1793.
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  • What Impact Did the Radio Have in the 1920s?

    Q: What Impact Did the Radio Have in the 1920s?

    A: Radio broadcasting began in earnest in 1920, when Westinghouse launched the first programmed broadcast of a radio station. KDKA began broadcasting on election day, and it was an instant success.
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  • Where Did Albert Einstein Live in America?

    Q: Where Did Albert Einstein Live in America?

    A: While in America, Einstein lived mostly in Princeton, New Jersey, where he worked for the Institute of Advanced Study. Earlier in his life, Einstein spent a few months in Pasadena, California, but then returned to Europe only to come back to the U.S.
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  • Which President Tailored His Own Suits?

    Q: Which President Tailored His Own Suits?

    A: Andrew Johnson was a tailor before he became president of the United States, and he continued making suits for himself even after he took office. Johnson served as the 17th president and began his term in 1865.
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  • Where Do Native Americans Live?

    Q: Where Do Native Americans Live?

    A: Many Native Americans live on reservations located in several of the Southwestern and Midwestern states. Some Natives, however, have fully integrated into contemporary American society and live in metropolitan cities.
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  • What Is the Difference Between the Pilgrims and Puritans?

    Q: What Is the Difference Between the Pilgrims and Puritans?

    A: The Pilgrims came to what is now the United States for the opportunity to practice their own religion, while the Puritans came to reform the beliefs of the Church of England and then spread them. The puritanical view was much more restorative than that of the Pilgrims.
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