US History

A:

Three presidents appear on both a note and a coin in U.S. currency. George Washington appears on the one-dollar bill and the quarter, Abraham Lincoln appears on the five-dollar bill and the penny and Thomas Jefferson appears on the two-dollar bill and the nickel.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • What is Harry Truman's hometown?

    Q: What is Harry Truman's hometown?

    A: Independence, Missouri is the hometown of 33rd President Harry Truman. Born in the small town of Lamar, Missouri, he moved to Independence at the age of six and returned to the city after his presidency.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are America's founding ideals, and why are they important?

    Q: What are America's founding ideals, and why are they important?

    A: America's founding ideals are democracy, rights, liberty, opportunity and equality, according to The Founding Ideals of America website. While many of the finer points of American ideals are debated, it is generally agreed that the importance of these five ideals cannot be understated in terms of importance to American society.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the weirdest job a president had before he was elected?

    Q: What is the weirdest job a president had before he was elected?

    A: Though what can be considered 'weird' is subjective, perhaps the least presidential pre-presidency job was held by Ronald Reagan, who was a Hollywood movie star before rising quickly through the political ranks to become one of America's most controversial presidents. Most U.S. presidents have worked in government jobs in some capacity or another, either as military leaders or as lawyers. Though Reagan served as governor of California prior to becoming president, his most relevant work experience to qualify for the governorship was serving as the president of the Screen Actor's Guild, a union for working actors (a role some would consider ironic given Reagan's anti-union political stance).
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What were Jumano houses like?

    Q: What were Jumano houses like?

    A: The Jumano Native Americans lived in pueblos, stick houses and tee-pees. Historian R. Edward Moore writes that the Texan Pueblan Jumanos lived in two- and three-story buildings made from large, baked-mud bricks. According to the Texas State Historical Society, Pueblan Jumanos in New Mexico built their pueblos from sticks and reeds instead of bricks. The Plains Jumanos were nomadic and lived in tee-pees..
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What was the outcome of the Scopes trial?

    Q: What was the outcome of the Scopes trial?

    A: The Scopes trial found the defendant John Scopes guilty of violating the Butler Act by teaching evolution in school. Scopes was fined $100, but this was overturned on a technicality. It also achieved the true goal of the staged trial, which was to draw attention and publicity to Dayton, Tenn., and to place the conflict between science and religion firmly before the public eye.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What was the role of women from 1920 through 1930?

    Q: What was the role of women from 1920 through 1930?

    A: Post World War I, social changes and the acquiring of the right to vote led to a decade of increased freedom for women in the 1920s. This freedom included working outside the home, becoming more involved in politics and radical changes in fashions.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What important historical events took place in California?

    Q: What important historical events took place in California?

    A: One of the most important historical events that occurred in California is the first exploration of the state in 1540 by the Spanish. An expedition was led by Hernando de Alarcon up the Gulf of California. This was the first time Europeans had stepped on California soil.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What were some of Clara Barton's accomplishments?

    Q: What were some of Clara Barton's accomplishments?

    A: Clara Barton's most significant and memorable achievement was founding the American Red Cross in 1881. She was also its leader for its first 23 years of operation. A schoolteacher by trade, Barton was involved in the Civil War as a nurse who aided wounded soldiers.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • How old was Rosa Parks when she was arrested?

    Q: How old was Rosa Parks when she was arrested?

    A: Civil Rights icon Rosa Parks was 42 years old when she was arrested on December 1, 1955, just a few weeks shy of her February 4 birthday. While riding on a segregated public bus in Montgomery, Alabama, Mrs. Parks was seated directly behind the front section designated for white passengers; that section filled up, and when a bus driver ordered Mrs. Parks to move to allow a white passenger to take her seat, she refused. She was arrested for this action, which violated a Montgomery city law that enforced the practice of racial segregation on public transportation.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What was the original color of the White House?

    Q: What was the original color of the White House?

    A: The original color of the White House was white. According to the White House Historical Association, when the walls were finished in 1798, they were whitewashed to keep the stone from freezing in winter.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What were the names of LBJ's beagles?

    Q: What were the names of LBJ's beagles?

    A: President Lyndon B. Johnson's beagles were named Him and Her. He also kept one of his daughter's beagles, Freckles, with him at the White House until giving it away to a White House staff member when his second term ended.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • When was the first official general election debate?

    Q: When was the first official general election debate?

    A: The first official presidential general election debate was held on September 26, 1960. It was televised and featured the Democratic presidential candidate, John F. Kennedy, and the Republican presidential candidate, Richard M. Nixon. It was the first of what became a standard practice of presidential candidates meeting for a public, televised debate in a standard format. In previous presidential elections there were informal debates between primary candidates, including radio broadcasts in specific states. There are also a few recorded instances of senatorial and other candidates debating publicly.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why did the Roanoke settlement fail?

    Q: Why did the Roanoke settlement fail?

    A: The Roanoke settlement is thought to have failed because it was poorly supplied and the colonists failed to ally with or befriend the Native peoples. Roanoke is referred to as the Lost Colony because of the mysterious disappearance of the settlers and the destruction of its buildings, giving birth to myths and conspiracy stories. However, historians contend that hardships and improved relations drove the colonists to assimilate with the Natives.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What were women's roles in the middle colonies?

    Q: What were women's roles in the middle colonies?

    A: The role of women in the Middle Colonies consisted mainly of cleaning, cooking and making goods. The goods that the women typically made were candles, butter, clothing and soap. Women were also expected to watch and take care of the children.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the most important world event that happened in 1962?

    Q: What is the most important world event that happened in 1962?

    A: The Cuban Missile Crisis was possibly the most important event of 1962 because the United States and the Soviet Union came close to engaging in nuclear war. Both countries avoided war likely due to efforts put into effective communication, as stated by the Office of the Historian.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Who helped the Pilgrims in the New World?

    Q: Who helped the Pilgrims in the New World?

    A: The Pilgrims were aided on their arrival to the new world by the Wampanoag Confederacy, specifically a Native American by the name of Tisquantum, or Squanto. He was a Native American who could speak English and had recently escaped from captivity in England.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why did the Pilgrim Fathers leave England?

    Q: Why did the Pilgrim Fathers leave England?

    A: The Pilgrim Fathers, or Puritans, left England to escape religious persecution. Their hope was that they could make a new start in the colonies and be safe to worship as they wanted.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What was the result of the Mexican American War?

    Q: What was the result of the Mexican American War?

    A: The result of the Mexican American War was the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo in 1848, which stated that Mexico had to give up land to the United States, including Texas. That land now makes up the states of California, Utah and Nevada, as well as parts of Colorado, Wyoming, New Mexico and Arizona. The treaty also established the national border of Mexico at the Rio Grande River.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why didn't the United States join the League of Nations?

    Q: Why didn't the United States join the League of Nations?

    A: The United States did not join the League of Nations because of opposition in the press and the U.S. Senate. Leading the opposition were Senators Henry Cabot Lodge and William Borah.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What was the first permanent English settlement in North America?

    Q: What was the first permanent English settlement in North America?

    A: Jamestown, Va., was the first permanent English settlement in the United States. It was founded in 1607 by a group of 104 people, as referenced by the National Park Service. The Virginia Company funded the expedition and told the group of settlers to make way for more people to arrive.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why did the Plains Indians live in tepees?

    Q: Why did the Plains Indians live in tepees?

    A: Plains Indians lived in tepees -- also known as teepees, tepes and tipis -- because these dwellings were easy to move as the Native Americans followed herds of migrating buffalo, or bison. Because they depended upon the animals for food and goods, the Plains Indians led nomadic lives in order to maintain a constant supply of bison. Tepees were relatively simple to transport and set up.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: