US History

A:

According to The Library of Congress, the "President's Book of Secrets" does not exist and is only a fictional reference in the movie "National Treasure: Book of Secrets." The movie made people believe the Library of Congress housed the book.

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  • How many years did slavery last?

    Q: How many years did slavery last?

    A: The host of human trafficking and forced labor colloquially called “slavery” in the modern usage could be said to have lasted approximately 373 years. That number varies according to different usages of the word.
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  • What was the Boston Massacre?

    Q: What was the Boston Massacre?

    A: The Boston Massacre was the killing of five colonial citizens by British troops on March 5, 1770. A mob was protesting new Parliamentary regulations, and several members began throwing sticks and rocks at the British soldiers attempting to restore order. Acting without orders, several of the soldiers fired into the crowd, killing three and wounding eight. Two later died of their injuries, bringing the death toll to five.
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  • What is the significance of the Battle of Gettysburg?

    Q: What is the significance of the Battle of Gettysburg?

    A: The Battle of Gettysburg was a significant turning point of the Civil War because it prevented a confederate invasion of the North and eliminated about one-third of General Lee's men. The Battle of Gettysburg was a three day battle that took place in Gettysburg, Pa., between July 1st and July 3rd of 1863.
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  • What are some facts about the Hoover Dam?

    Q: What are some facts about the Hoover Dam?

    A: The Hoover Dam, often considered to be one of the great architectural wonders of the world, cost $49 million to build in 1935. It is 726 feet high and 1,200 feet wide. The thickest part of the dam, at the base, is 660 feet thick, which is almost the equivalent of two football fields.
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  • Who opposed the New Deal?

    Q: Who opposed the New Deal?

    A: Roosevelt's New Deal faced opposition from the upper class, a number of media personalities and even the Supreme Court. Opponents of the New Deal claimed many of the proposed domestic programs would be too great a burden on the rich.
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  • Was Benjamin Franklin a key player in getting the Stamp Act repealed?

    Q: Was Benjamin Franklin a key player in getting the Stamp Act repealed?

    A: Yes, according to the History World website, Benjamin Franklin played an integral role in the repeal of the Stamp Act by the British Parliament. The Stamp Act was the first direct tax on the American colonies implemented without asking for a vote from the various American state assemblies.
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  • What are some examples of Revolutionary War artifacts?

    Q: What are some examples of Revolutionary War artifacts?

    A: Revolutionary War artifacts consist mostly of pistols and swords used during the conflict and everyday items and furnishings. The Revolutionary Period took place from 1769 to 1787. Antiques from the time include a 1767 French infantry sword and scabbard, a rare Flintlock iron and wood derringer made with a scroll accent and an antique flintlock blunderbuss pistol.
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  • Who was Agent 355 in the Revolutionary War?

    Q: Who was Agent 355 in the Revolutionary War?

    A: Some of the most famous names associated with the American Revolutionary War include Paul Revere and George Washington, but at least one important figure’s identity is a mystery. Agent 355 was a female undercover officer and member of the Culper Ring, a secret spy organization for the colonists. Her identity remains unknown to this day.
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  • What did Betsy Ross do in the Revolutionary War?

    Q: What did Betsy Ross do in the Revolutionary War?

    A: Betsy Ross sewed flags during the Revolutionary War. Although it is rumored that she sewed the first American flag at the request of George Washington during that time, there is no historical evidence to substantiate the claim.
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  • Why did the Plains Indians live in tepees?

    Q: Why did the Plains Indians live in tepees?

    A: Plains Indians lived in tepees -- also known as teepees, tepes and tipis -- because these dwellings were easy to move as the Native Americans followed herds of migrating buffalo, or bison. Because they depended upon the animals for food and goods, the Plains Indians led nomadic lives in order to maintain a constant supply of bison. Tepees were relatively simple to transport and set up.
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  • What did the Warren Commission determine?

    Q: What did the Warren Commission determine?

    A: The Warren Commission found that Lee Harvey Oswald was the sole being responsible for carrying out the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. The commission was formed by President Lyndon Johnson after the death of President Kennedy.
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  • Why did Theodore Roosevelt win the Nobel Peace Prize?

    Q: Why did Theodore Roosevelt win the Nobel Peace Prize?

    A: Theodore Roosevelt won the Nobel Peace Prize for his involvement in various peace treaties. Roosevelt was instrumental in peace negotiations during the Russo-Japanese War, namely in his work on the Treaty of Portsmouth. His actions also led to the peaceful resolution of a dispute between the United States of America and Mexico.
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  • Which president was shot while speaking and still finished the speech?

    Q: Which president was shot while speaking and still finished the speech?

    A: President Theodore 'Teddy' Roosevelt was shot in the chest during a speech in 1912; Roosevelt not only survived the shot but also continued to deliver his public address. Roosevelt, who was 53 years old at the time, was not serving an active term as president, though he was campaigning for a presidential term as a member of the Progressive Party. Though the shot was accurate and hit in a location that could have done grievous harm to the former president, he had a number of items in his jacket pockets, including the speech text itself and an eyeglasses case, that helped to reduce the bullet's impact.
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  • Where did the Cheyenne Indians live?

    Q: Where did the Cheyenne Indians live?

    A: The Cheyenne originally settled in Minnesota as a woodland tribe, but they became horse-nomads of the Great Plains in the 1600s due to the influx of European settlers in the east. The Cheyenne Nation occupied the land from the Black Hills of South Dakota to southern Colorado at its peak.
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  • How many people boarded the Titanic?

    Q: How many people boarded the Titanic?

    A: On April 10, 1912, 2,228 people boarded the Titanic. Of those, 1,343 of these people were passengers and 885 people were members of the crew.
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  • Who created the 50-star American flag?

    Q: Who created the 50-star American flag?

    A: The modern-day Betsy Ross was actually a high school student. Robert G. "Bob" Heft created his version of the 50-star flag in 1958 while he was just 17 years old in Lancaster, Ohio. He anticipated the addition of Hawaii and Alaska to the United States, and his design was chosen by President Dwight D. Eisenhower to be the 27th version of the U.S. flag.
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  • How did the colonists react to the Boston Massacre?

    Q: How did the colonists react to the Boston Massacre?

    A: After the Boston Massacre, colonists were largely outraged at what they saw as a vicious attack on unarmed civilians. Supporters of the Patriot movement were quick to capitalize on this, and they released engravings and written accounts of the incident designed to portray the British soldiers in the most negative light possible. The incident was regularly cited in the years between the massacre and the War of Independence.
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  • Were the moon landings a hoax?

    Q: Were the moon landings a hoax?

    A: On July 21, 1969, at 02:56 UTC, Neil Armstrong became the first human to set foot on the lunar surface. Definitive proof of this event is available from multiple sources, including hundreds of independent observatories, which regularly make use of laser refractory arrays that were placed during later Apollo missions.
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  • Which U.S. Presidents have had tattoos?

    Q: Which U.S. Presidents have had tattoos?

    A: Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, James K. Polk, Andrew Jackson and Dwight D. Eisenhower were all rumored to have tattoos. Theodore Roosevelt was the only president to have a confirmed tattoo on his body.
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  • Which president was arrested for running someone over with a horse?

    Q: Which president was arrested for running someone over with a horse?

    A: Franklin Pierce was the 14th president of the United States, and he was arrested while serving as president for running down an old woman while on horseback. Pierce was never convicted of a crime connected to the incident, due to what the courts described as insufficient evidence. Though this incident is merely a historical blip, Pierce is reported to have a shaky safety record with horses in other areas, including an incident during the Mexican-American War in which he was pinned down by his horse, which was a major embarrassment for Pierce.
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  • How do you learn about arrowhead identification?

    Q: How do you learn about arrowhead identification?

    A: Arrowhead identification, which involves collecting and reviewing the tips of arrows and spears used by Native Americans, can be completed on the Internet on such sites as WarPaths2Peacepipes. Reviewing the site will give you a basic understanding of the various points and shapes that were once used by Native Americans in the recent and distant past.
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