US History

A:

The four faces carved into the side of Mount Rushmore are each about 60 feet tall, which is the equivalent of a six-story building. Each eye's width is about 11 feet, and the mouths are up to 18 feet wide. The noses are around 20 feet long, with George Washington having the longest nose, measuring 21 feet.

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  • Where did Lincoln write the "Gettysburg Address"?

    Q: Where did Lincoln write the "Gettysburg Address"?

    A: The basic draft of the Gettysburg Address was written by President Abraham Lincoln in Washington, D.C. On the evening of Nov. 18, 1863 Lincoln made final changes to the speech at the home of Gettysburg attorney David Willis.
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  • When was the first official general election debate?

    Q: When was the first official general election debate?

    A: The first official presidential general election debate was held on September 26, 1960. It was televised and featured the Democratic presidential candidate, John F. Kennedy, and the Republican presidential candidate, Richard M. Nixon. It was the first of what became a standard practice of presidential candidates meeting for a public, televised debate in a standard format. In previous presidential elections there were informal debates between primary candidates, including radio broadcasts in specific states. There are also a few recorded instances of senatorial and other candidates debating publicly.
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  • How many rooms are in the White House?

    Q: How many rooms are in the White House?

    A: As of 2014, there are 132 rooms across six levels in the White House, along with eight staircases, six elevators, 35 bathrooms, 28 fireplaces, 412 doors and 147 windows. The White House has undergone several remodeling projects and additions throughout its history, which began in 1791 when President George Washington himself selected the site for the president of the United States' home. Though he selected the site, Washington never lived in the White House; John Adams and his wife Abigail Adams took residence in the first official version of the executive mansion in 1800, when the house was still unfinished.
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  • How did the colonists react to the Boston Massacre?

    Q: How did the colonists react to the Boston Massacre?

    A: After the Boston Massacre, colonists were largely outraged at what they saw as a vicious attack on unarmed civilians. Supporters of the Patriot movement were quick to capitalize on this, and they released engravings and written accounts of the incident designed to portray the British soldiers in the most negative light possible. The incident was regularly cited in the years between the massacre and the War of Independence.
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  • What were three causes of the War of 1812?

    Q: What were three causes of the War of 1812?

    A: The primary causes of the War of 1812 began with the Orders in Council, a statute passed by Britain in 1807 that placed restrictions on trade between the United States and France. Next, the British Navy conducted impressment on U.S. ships. Lastly, British support of Native Americans angered Americans.
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  • Which president bought slaves in order to free them?

    Q: Which president bought slaves in order to free them?

    A: The Pennsylvania Historical Museum and Commission reports that President James Buchanan, who served as the 15th U.S. president beginning in 1856, would personally purchase slaves in order to free them. As a politician, however, Buchanan believed that the practice of enslaving human beings was protected by the Constitution, and he looked down on some actions that abolitionists took. He adhered to the same philosophy as Thomas Jefferson, which was that slavery would naturally come to an end without any sort of intervention.
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  • How long did Rosa Parks go to jail for?

    Q: How long did Rosa Parks go to jail for?

    A: Rosa Parks was in jail for roughly a day. The president of the NAACP Edgar Nixon bailed Rosa Parks out of jail one day after her arrest for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on Dec. 1, 1955. The courts convicted her of disorderly conduct four days after her arrest.
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  • Which White House chef served famously unappetizing meals?

    Q: Which White House chef served famously unappetizing meals?

    A: When Franklin Roosevelt was elected president, first lady Eleanor Roosevelt hired Henrietta Nesbitt to be the White House's housekeeper and head chef. While Nesbitt successfully transformed the old, outdated kitchen into a modern and more efficient place to prepare meals, not many people would say that the new kitchen was put to good use. Nesbitt's menus were notoriously unappealing.
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  • Did Edgar Allan Poe cut off his ear?

    Q: Did Edgar Allan Poe cut off his ear?

    A: There is no viable proof that poet, Edgar Allan Poe, cut off his ear. Poe did attempt suicide in 1848, according to Listverse, and he died on Oct. 7, 1849 of unknown causes. The painter Vincent Van Gogh was an artist who actually did cut off his own ear.
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  • Did Thomas Edison have brothers or sisters?

    Q: Did Thomas Edison have brothers or sisters?

    A: Yes, Thomas Edison had six siblings, both brothers and sisters. Thomas himself was the youngest of all the seven Edison children.
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  • Where is Albert Einstein buried?

    Q: Where is Albert Einstein buried?

    A: Albert Einstein was not buried; he was cremated, and the location of his ashes is unknown. Einstein died in 1955 at a New Jersey hospital at the age of 76. The cause was internal bleeding, stemming from a burst aneurysm.
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  • How many second-class cabins did the Titanic have?

    Q: How many second-class cabins did the Titanic have?

    A: The Titanic had 162 second-class rooms, containing 510 berths. These rooms could hold up to 550 passengers, though there were only 277 second-class passengers on the voyage. Of this amount, 118 survived.
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  • What hardships did American pioneers face?

    Q: What hardships did American pioneers face?

    A: In America's early days, pioneers headed west to make new homes or become gold prospectors, and on their journeys, which were often thousands of miles, they encountered disease, treacherous roads and enemies. Traveling rough roads in covered wagons often resulted in death from failed river crossings, accidents or Indian attacks.
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  • Why did thousands of American banks close after the stock market crash?

    Q: Why did thousands of American banks close after the stock market crash?

    A: According to History.com, when the U.S. stock market crashed in October 1929, many American banks began closing because consumers pulled all of their money out of the banks, including investments and cash accounts, and began to default on loans. Because the banks had to liquidate loans and sell assets to pay consumers withdrawing their funds, the banks began to fail due to lack of funds.
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  • Where did the Ojibwa Indians live?

    Q: Where did the Ojibwa Indians live?

    A: Originally, the Ojibwa Indians lived around the Great Lakes region of the United States. As the years went on, the Anishinabe, as they called themselves, spread out into other parts of Michigan and also into Canada.
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  • What was a colonial potter?

    Q: What was a colonial potter?

    A: A colonial potter was an early American colonist who created pottery items as his trade. Much like a blacksmith makes items out of metals, a potter creates items out of feldspar, a type of rock that is used to produce clay.
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  • Was President Andrew Jackson a hero or a villain?

    Q: Was President Andrew Jackson a hero or a villain?

    A: Andrew Jackson was a popular president in many ways, especially among white male landowners, but he was also a fierce proponent of Native American removal and relocation, making him a villain to some. Like most people, Andrew Jackson's character is difficult to pin down as being either all hero or all villain.
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  • How did Neil Armstrong change the world?

    Q: How did Neil Armstrong change the world?

    A: Neil Armstrong changed the world by becoming the first man in history to successfully pilot a spacecraft to land safely on the lunar surface and then walk on the moon. This not only was a high point in space exploration but also put the United States ahead of the Soviet Union in the space race during the Cold War.
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  • What is Franklin D. Roosevelt famous for?

    Q: What is Franklin D. Roosevelt famous for?

    A: Franklin D. Roosevelt was the 32nd president of the United States. Roosevelt served as president from Mar. 4, 1933, to April 12, 1945. Prior to becoming president, he was a governor and senator in the state of New York.
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  • Why was Richard Nixon called "Tricky Dick"?

    Q: Why was Richard Nixon called "Tricky Dick"?

    A: According to About.com's Steve Smith, the nickname "Tricky Dick" for Richard Nixon, the 37th President of the United States, was a response to smear campaign he ran against Helen Douglas when both were competing for a Senate seat in 1950. He was first referred to as "Tricky Dick" in a 1950 newspaper campaign funded by a Democratic committee urging citizens to “Look at Tricky Dick Nixon’s Republican Record.”
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  • Who was the first left-handed president?

    Q: Who was the first left-handed president?

    A: The first left-handed U.S. president was James Garfield, who served as the 20th president of the United States and is said to have been ambidextrous (capable of using both the left and the right hand). Herbert Hoover, who began his term in 1929, was likely the first fully left-handed president. Since then, a number of left-handed presidents have served, including Barack Obama, whose term began in 2008.
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