US History

A:

The original color of the White House was white. According to the White House Historical Association, when the walls were finished in 1798, they were whitewashed to keep the stone from freezing in winter.

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  • What was Albert Einstein's middle name?

    Q: What was Albert Einstein's middle name?

    A: Albert Einstein did not have a middle name. He was born on March 14, 1879, in Ulm, Württemberg, Germany. Some of his most remarkable work was completed while he worked as a patent clerk, because he could not find a teaching job.
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  • Who was Agent 355 in the Revolutionary War?

    Q: Who was Agent 355 in the Revolutionary War?

    A: Some of the most famous names associated with the American Revolutionary War include Paul Revere and George Washington, but at least one important figure’s identity is a mystery. Agent 355 was a female undercover officer and member of the Culper Ring, a secret spy organization for the colonists. Her identity remains unknown to this day.
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  • Who were James Madison's parents?

    Q: Who were James Madison's parents?

    A: The parents of James Madison were Nelly Conway Madison and Col. James Madison, Sr. James Madison was born in 1751. James Madson, Sr. married Nelly Conway in 1749, and the couple had 12 children. James, who was the first born child, was the fourth Presidant of the United States.
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  • What was the first form of our national government?

    Q: What was the first form of our national government?

    A: The first form of national government in the United States was a loose confederacy of states governed according to the Articles of Confederation, according to History.com. This government was created in response to the urgency of the American Revolution but was not functional for the long-term governing of a nation.
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  • Where did Albert Einstein live in America?

    Q: Where did Albert Einstein live in America?

    A: While in America, Einstein lived mostly in Princeton, New Jersey, where he worked for the Institute of Advanced Study. Earlier in his life, Einstein spent a few months in Pasadena, California, but then returned to Europe only to come back to the U.S.
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  • Who opposed the New Deal?

    Q: Who opposed the New Deal?

    A: Roosevelt's New Deal faced opposition from the upper class, a number of media personalities and even the Supreme Court. Opponents of the New Deal claimed many of the proposed domestic programs would be too great a burden on the rich.
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  • When were the Articles of Confederation approved?

    Q: When were the Articles of Confederation approved?

    A: After adoption by the Continental Congress on Nov. 15, 1777, the Articles of Confederation were eventually approved by all 13 states by March 1, 1781. The Articles served as the written document that established the functions of the federal government.
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  • What is Pocahontas famous for?

    Q: What is Pocahontas famous for?

    A: Pocahontas, a young Algonquin woman, is famous for saving the life of Captain John Smith in 1607 when he was captured by her father and condemned to death. Afterwards, she helped the settlers of Jamestown, Va., by bringing them gifts of food to stave off starvation. Later, she married Englishman John Rolfe and visited England. It was the first recorded instance of an interracial marriage between a settler and Indian.
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  • Where did the Battle of Gettysburg take place?

    Q: Where did the Battle of Gettysburg take place?

    A: The Battle of Gettysburg took place in and around Gettysburg, Penn. Most historians view this battle as the moment in the U.S. Civil War when the tide turned irrevocably against the Confederate forces.
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  • Who was Abigail Williams?

    Q: Who was Abigail Williams?

    A: Abigail Williams was an accuser during the Salem witch trials in 1692. Her accusations resulted in the arrests of many people in the community. She was never mentioned in historical records after the trial, and she was featured as a prominent character in Arthur Miller's play, The Crucible.
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  • Which American presidents were accused of abusing their presidential power?

    Q: Which American presidents were accused of abusing their presidential power?

    A: Presidents accused of using their power for personal gain include Richard Nixon and Warren G. Harding. Additionally, there are otherwise good presidents who are accused of stretching their presidential powers to the limit at certain points during their tenure.
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  • What did the Pilgrims bring on the Mayflower?

    Q: What did the Pilgrims bring on the Mayflower?

    A: The Pilgrims brought arms and armor, household goods, tools, seeds, bedding, clothing and food that kept well. A few brought a limited amount of furniture, such as chairs and cradles, and at least two dogs were also on board. The overcrowded Mayflower did not have room for livestock or large items.
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  • When was the first official general election debate?

    Q: When was the first official general election debate?

    A: The first official presidential general election debate was held on September 26, 1960. It was televised and featured the Democratic presidential candidate, John F. Kennedy, and the Republican presidential candidate, Richard M. Nixon. It was the first of what became a standard practice of presidential candidates meeting for a public, televised debate in a standard format. In previous presidential elections there were informal debates between primary candidates, including radio broadcasts in specific states. There are also a few recorded instances of senatorial and other candidates debating publicly.
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  • How do you explain the XYZ Affair?

    Q: How do you explain the XYZ Affair?

    A: The XYZ Affair was a diplomatic crisis between the United States and France from 1797 to 1798 during which President John Adams sent three envoys to France to prevent a full-scale war, according to the Thomas Jefferson Foundation. The name of the incident comes from Adams's use of X, Y and Z to denote three French ministers' names in publicly released diplomatic correspondence.
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  • What jobs did the pioneers hold?

    Q: What jobs did the pioneers hold?

    A: American pioneers were primarily farmers by necessity. Farming was a way of survival and established a claim of land ownership. While farming was their primary occupation, pioneers were also hunters, trappers, loggers and carpenters.
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  • What impact did the radio have in the 1920s?

    Q: What impact did the radio have in the 1920s?

    A: Radio broadcasting began in earnest in 1920, when Westinghouse launched the first programmed broadcast of a radio station. KDKA began broadcasting on election day, and it was an instant success.
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  • What are some similarities between Martin Luther King Jr., Gandhi and Thoreau?

    Q: What are some similarities between Martin Luther King Jr., Gandhi and Thoreau?

    A: Martin Luther King Jr., Mahatma Ghandi and Henry David Thoreau all advocated for civil disobedience through non-violent means. Also, each of these individuals was, at one time or another, imprisoned for his own non-violent civil disobedience.
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  • What are some facts about Annie Oakley?

    Q: What are some facts about Annie Oakley?

    A: Annie Oakley was an American folk hero and performer who is known for her marksmanship. She was born in Ohio as Phoebe Ann Moses in 1860 and took up sharpshooting as a teenager to earn money after her father's death. By the time she was 15 years old, Annie had paid off her family's mortgage with her performances.
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  • Who gave the Statue of Liberty to the United States?

    Q: Who gave the Statue of Liberty to the United States?

    A: The Statue of Liberty was given to United States by France. It was originally named "Liberty Enlightening the World." It was created by the French sculptor Frederic-Auguste Bartholdi.
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  • How many people died building the Empire State Building?

    Q: How many people died building the Empire State Building?

    A: According to official records, five people died while constructing the Empire State Building. One was struck by a truck, another fell down an elevator shaft, a third was killed by explosives, a fourth struck by a hoist and the fifth fell from scaffolding.
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  • What were the names of LBJ's beagles?

    Q: What were the names of LBJ's beagles?

    A: President Lyndon B. Johnson's beagles were named Him and Her. He also kept one of his daughter's beagles, Freckles, with him at the White House until giving it away to a White House staff member when his second term ended.
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