US History

A:

As of today, 44 men have become president of the United States. Donald Trump is regarded as the 45th president, however, because Grover Cleveland served two nonsuccessive terms.

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  • Why Was the Battle of Yorktown Important?

    Q: Why Was the Battle of Yorktown Important?

    A: The Battle of Yorktown was important because it triggered the point of final surrender for British forces. The battle was the last major conflict during the American Revolution, and its outcome in favor of the Americans effectively sealed the British loss. British casualties in this battle were nearly twice those of the Americans.
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  • How Do You Summarize the "I Have a Dream" Speech?

    Q: How Do You Summarize the "I Have a Dream" Speech?

    A: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered what is commonly known as the "I have a dream" speech on Aug. 28, 1963, at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. The speech, which was partly improvised by King on the spot, started off with an observation that black people were still not free more than 100 years after the Emancipation Proclamation and ended with the famous "I have a dream" section in which he hoped for a better future for all people. King's speech is considered by many to be one of the key defining moments of the civil rights movement.
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  • How Many Kids Did Thomas Jefferson Have?

    Q: How Many Kids Did Thomas Jefferson Have?

    A: President Thomas Jefferson had six children with his wife, Martha. The eldest, Martha, and the fourth born, Mary, were the only two Jefferson children that survived to adulthood.
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  • What Were Some of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Beliefs?

    Q: What Were Some of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Beliefs?

    A: King believed in many things, and one was that black Americans should be compensated for all the wrongs that had been done to them throughout history. He stated that by granting these people equality could not realistically makeup for everything that had been done in the past.
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  • What Hardships Did American Pioneers Face?

    Q: What Hardships Did American Pioneers Face?

    A: In America's early days, pioneers headed west to make new homes or become gold prospectors, and on their journeys, which were often thousands of miles, they encountered disease, treacherous roads and enemies. Traveling rough roads in covered wagons often resulted in death from failed river crossings, accidents or Indian attacks.
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  • What Made Martin Luther King Famous?

    Q: What Made Martin Luther King Famous?

    A: Martin Luther King's leadership and belief in peaceful protesting during the Civil Rights Movement made him famous. In addition, King is famous for his "I Have a Dream" speech. Dr. King is also known for organizing the Selma to Montgomery March and the March on Washington. These events proved to be pivotal moments in the Civil Rights Movement.
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  • What Was the Average Weekly Pay for a Female Factory Worker in 1944?

    Q: What Was the Average Weekly Pay for a Female Factory Worker in 1944?

    A: In 1944, a female worker in a factory earned approximately $32.21 per week. In contrast, a male factory worker made around $54.65 weekly. In modern times, that equals about $430 per week for women and $730 weekly for men.
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  • Where Do Native Americans Live?

    Q: Where Do Native Americans Live?

    A: Many Native Americans live on reservations located in several of the Southwestern and Midwestern states. Some Natives, however, have fully integrated into contemporary American society and live in metropolitan cities.
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  • What Were Iroquois Canoes?

    Q: What Were Iroquois Canoes?

    A: Iroquois canoes were water vessels made out of elm bark or a hollowed-out log. Though most styles of Native-American canoes were built to be light and swift, Iroquois canoes could be very long, as much as 30 feet in length. They could carry a passenger load of 18 people.
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  • What Did the Indians Teach the Pilgrims to Plant?

    Q: What Did the Indians Teach the Pilgrims to Plant?

    A: According to the Plimouth Plantation, the Wampanoag tribe taught the Pilgrims how to grow Indian corn. Indian corn is a different variety of corn than the type that is familiar to most Americans.
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  • Why Did Hamilton Support the National Bank?

    Q: Why Did Hamilton Support the National Bank?

    A: Alexander Hamilton supported a national bank because the United States needed some way to recovery financially after the Revolutionary War. At the time, the United States had no common currency. The creation of a national bank would facilitate the creation of a common currency.
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  • Who Ran Against Kennedy in the 1960 Election?

    Q: Who Ran Against Kennedy in the 1960 Election?

    A: John F. Kennedy's opponent in the 1960 presidential election was Richard Nixon. In the Democratic primaries, Kennedy faced a number of candidates, of whom the most formidable were Lyndon B. Johnson, Hubert Humphrey and Stuart Symington.
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  • Why Was the Statue of Liberty Built?

    Q: Why Was the Statue of Liberty Built?

    A: The Statue of Liberty was built as a recognition of the friendship between France and the United States. The statue itself was designed by French sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi, while the pedestal was designed by American architect Richard Morris Hunt. Though the idea was initially conceived in 1865, it took over 20 years for the statue to be completed, with the formal dedication occurring on October 28, 1886.
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  • What Are Some Countries Currently Embargoed by the United States?

    Q: What Are Some Countries Currently Embargoed by the United States?

    A: As of 2014, countries embargoed by the United States include Burma, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Sudan and Syria. Sanctions placed on other countries by the United States can be either comprehensive or selective. The United States also has sanctions placed on individuals in many countries, including Iraq, Lebanon, Russia, Somalia and Yemen.
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  • What Was the Boston Massacre?

    Q: What Was the Boston Massacre?

    A: The Boston Massacre was the killing of five colonial citizens by British troops on March 5, 1770. A mob was protesting new Parliamentary regulations, and several members began throwing sticks and rocks at the British soldiers attempting to restore order. Acting without orders, several of the soldiers fired into the crowd, killing three and wounding eight. Two later died of their injuries, bringing the death toll to five.
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  • Who Was the First Left-Handed President?

    Q: Who Was the First Left-Handed President?

    A: The first left-handed U.S. president was James Garfield, who served as the 20th president of the United States and is said to have been ambidextrous (capable of using both the left and the right hand). Herbert Hoover, who began his term in 1929, was likely the first fully left-handed president. Since then, a number of left-handed presidents have served, including Barack Obama, whose term began in 2008.
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  • What Did George Washington Warn Against in His Farewell Address?

    Q: What Did George Washington Warn Against in His Farewell Address?

    A: George Washington warned Americans against entering permanent alliances with other nations and against having great passions either for or against any foreign nation in his farewell address. Instead, he urged the nation to agree to temporary alliances as necessary. The United States formed no long-term alliances for more than 150 years after his address.
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  • What Is the Significance of the Battle of Gettysburg?

    Q: What Is the Significance of the Battle of Gettysburg?

    A: The Battle of Gettysburg was a significant turning point of the Civil War because it prevented a confederate invasion of the North and eliminated about one-third of General Lee's men. The Battle of Gettysburg was a three day battle that took place in Gettysburg, Pa., between July 1st and July 3rd of 1863.
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  • How Old Was Rosa Parks When She Was Arrested?

    Q: How Old Was Rosa Parks When She Was Arrested?

    A: Civil Rights icon Rosa Parks was 42 years old when she was arrested on December 1, 1955, just a few weeks shy of her February 4 birthday. While riding on a segregated public bus in Montgomery, Alabama, Mrs. Parks was seated directly behind the front section designated for white passengers; that section filled up, and when a bus driver ordered Mrs. Parks to move to allow a white passenger to take her seat, she refused. She was arrested for this action, which violated a Montgomery city law that enforced the practice of racial segregation on public transportation.
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  • What Did Martin Luther King, Jr. Fight For?

    Q: What Did Martin Luther King, Jr. Fight For?

    A: Martin Luther King, Jr. was a humanitarian and social reformer who fought for African-American civil rights during the 1950s and 60s. He was assassinated in 1968.
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  • What Is Harry Truman's Hometown?

    Q: What Is Harry Truman's Hometown?

    A: Independence, Missouri is the hometown of 33rd President Harry Truman. Born in the small town of Lamar, Missouri, he moved to Independence at the age of six and returned to the city after his presidency.
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