US History

A:

As of today, 44 men have become president of the United States. Donald Trump is regarded as the 45th president, however, because Grover Cleveland served two nonsuccessive terms.

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  • What was George Washington's height?

    Q: What was George Washington's height?

    A: George Washington was 6 feet 2 inches tall. He was not the tallest president of the United States, as that distinction goes to Abraham Lincoln who was 6 feet 4 inches tall. Lyndon Johnson was the second tallest president with a height of 6 feet 3 inches.
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  • How many years did slavery last?

    Q: How many years did slavery last?

    A: The host of human trafficking and forced labor colloquially called “slavery” in the modern usage could be said to have lasted approximately 373 years. That number varies according to different usages of the word.
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  • What was the closest presidential election?

    Q: What was the closest presidential election?

    A: The 1960 presidential race between John F. Kennedy and Richard Nixon was the closest presidential election in U.S. history in terms of the popular vote and the electoral college votes. Kennedy won the race by 0.1 percent, a victory that was not announced until noon the next day.
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  • Which White House chef served famously unappetizing meals?

    Q: Which White House chef served famously unappetizing meals?

    A: When Franklin Roosevelt was elected president, first lady Eleanor Roosevelt hired Henrietta Nesbitt to be the White House's housekeeper and head chef. While Nesbitt successfully transformed the old, outdated kitchen into a modern and more efficient place to prepare meals, not many people would say that the new kitchen was put to good use. Nesbitt's menus were notoriously unappealing.
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  • What was the cause of the Trail of Tears?

    Q: What was the cause of the Trail of Tears?

    A: The Trail of Tears was caused by the authorization and enforcement of the Indian Removal Act of 1830. This initiative, passed by President Andrew Jackson, forced over 20,000 Native Americans out of their ancestral lands in North Georgia. The vast majority of these Native Americans were from the Cherokee Nation.
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  • Who ran against Kennedy in the 1960 election?

    Q: Who ran against Kennedy in the 1960 election?

    A: John F. Kennedy's opponent in the 1960 presidential election was Richard Nixon. In the Democratic primaries, Kennedy faced a number of candidates, of whom the most formidable were Lyndon B. Johnson, Hubert Humphrey and Stuart Symington.
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  • What is gold panning equipment?

    Q: What is gold panning equipment?

    A: Gold panning equipment is used to help prospectors pan for gold. The basic tools include a small bottle for storing gold, a paintbrush or garden trowel to brush dirt from the crevice, a mini pick-shovel combo, a bucket to carry supplies, a magnet, and a lightweight plastic gold pan.
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  • What were some results of the War of 1812?

    Q: What were some results of the War of 1812?

    A: Though neither the British nor the Americans gained or lost territory during the War of 1812, the conflict had many results, including the establishment of the Canadian border, the end of British influence among the northwest Indians, and the demise of the Federalist Party due to its anti-war stance. It also boosted American patriotism and self-confidence, and led to a time of prosperity known as the "Era of Good Feelings."
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  • What jobs did the pioneers hold?

    Q: What jobs did the pioneers hold?

    A: American pioneers were primarily farmers by necessity. Farming was a way of survival and established a claim of land ownership. While farming was their primary occupation, pioneers were also hunters, trappers, loggers and carpenters.
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  • How many people died building the Empire State Building?

    Q: How many people died building the Empire State Building?

    A: According to official records, five people died while constructing the Empire State Building. One was struck by a truck, another fell down an elevator shaft, a third was killed by explosives, a fourth struck by a hoist and the fifth fell from scaffolding.
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  • What was Albert Einstein's middle name?

    Q: What was Albert Einstein's middle name?

    A: Albert Einstein did not have a middle name. He was born on March 14, 1879, in Ulm, Württemberg, Germany. Some of his most remarkable work was completed while he worked as a patent clerk, because he could not find a teaching job.
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  • Why did America expand westward?

    Q: Why did America expand westward?

    A: America expanded westward from the 13 colonies because the growing nation needed more space for an increasing population and more natural resources. The 1803 purchase of the Louisiana Territory vastly increased the space available for pioneers and settlers, and the United States offered incentives for entrepreneurs to move west and establish their own homesteads. Manifest Destiny was the belief that America was destined to expand west to fill the continent.
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  • Was Benjamin Franklin a key player in getting the Stamp Act repealed?

    Q: Was Benjamin Franklin a key player in getting the Stamp Act repealed?

    A: Yes, according to the History World website, Benjamin Franklin played an integral role in the repeal of the Stamp Act by the British Parliament. The Stamp Act was the first direct tax on the American colonies implemented without asking for a vote from the various American state assemblies.
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  • What was a colonial potter?

    Q: What was a colonial potter?

    A: A colonial potter was an early American colonist who created pottery items as his trade. Much like a blacksmith makes items out of metals, a potter creates items out of feldspar, a type of rock that is used to produce clay.
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  • Why is John F. Kennedy famous?

    Q: Why is John F. Kennedy famous?

    A: John F. Kennedy was the 35th president of the United States, and he remains famous for the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty, the Alliance for Progress and his own assassination. He was also an active advocate of civil rights in America.
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  • Who did Theodore Roosevelt run against?

    Q: Who did Theodore Roosevelt run against?

    A: Theodore Roosevelt ran against Alton Parker in the presidential election of 1904. Roosevelt was the incumbent president, having taken over the presidency when William McKinley was assassinated.
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  • How many rooms are in the White House?

    Q: How many rooms are in the White House?

    A: As of 2014, there are 132 rooms across six levels in the White House, along with eight staircases, six elevators, 35 bathrooms, 28 fireplaces, 412 doors and 147 windows. The White House has undergone several remodeling projects and additions throughout its history, which began in 1791 when President George Washington himself selected the site for the president of the United States' home. Though he selected the site, Washington never lived in the White House; John Adams and his wife Abigail Adams took residence in the first official version of the executive mansion in 1800, when the house was still unfinished.
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  • Why did they call Ronald Reagan "The Gipper"?

    Q: Why did they call Ronald Reagan "The Gipper"?

    A: Ronald Reagan was a professional actor before he was elected president, and he portrayed American college football player George "The Gipper" Gipp in the 1940 film "Knut Rockne, All American." The phrase "Win one for the Gipper" was purportedly said by Gipp on his hospital bed.
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  • Who convinced France to aid the Colonists?

    Q: Who convinced France to aid the Colonists?

    A: According to the Office of the Historian, Benjamin Franklin persuaded France to aid the colonists in their rebellion against the British. While Franklin was popular and admired in France, however, it was ultimately the British surrender at the Battle of Saratoga in December 1777 that encouraged the French to join.
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  • What exactly is cow punching?

    Q: What exactly is cow punching?

    A: Cow punching is the act of herding cattle. Although the name suggests hitting cattle, the physical act of punching is not involved in cow punching at all. Rather, it encompasses actions such as wrangling, herding, and branding cattle.
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  • Why was the Battle of Yorktown important?

    Q: Why was the Battle of Yorktown important?

    A: The Battle of Yorktown was important because it triggered the point of final surrender for British forces. The battle was the last major conflict during the American Revolution, and its outcome in favor of the Americans effectively sealed the British loss. British casualties in this battle were nearly twice those of the Americans.
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