Modern History

A:

There is no specific date that marked the beginning of the Cold War, but most agree that it began shortly following the second World War, somewhere from 1945 to 1947. Unlike other wars, the Cold War never involved actual fighting or traditional war events, but instead describes a prolonged tense state between the United States and Russia.

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  • What Was the City of Timbuktu Best Known For?

    Q: What Was the City of Timbuktu Best Known For?

    A: The city of Timbuktu is best known for its trade in gold, salt and superior schools. Some people even called it the “Golden City” for this reason. Between the 13th and 17th centuries, Timbuktu was the center of learning in the Islamic world. This occurred due to the financial boom in growth in the city during the 13th and 14th centuries.
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  • What Did Nelson Mandela Fight For?

    Q: What Did Nelson Mandela Fight For?

    A: Nelson Mandela fought to end apartheid, which divided people in South Africans based on race. After his release from prison, he sought reconciliation. He is credited with helping South Africa move past its unjust history.
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  • How Many Years Was Nelson Mandela Imprisoned?

    Q: How Many Years Was Nelson Mandela Imprisoned?

    A: Nelson Mandela was imprisoned for 27 years, 18 of which were spent at the infamously cruel Robben Island Prison in South Africa, where he was held from 1964 - 1982. Mandela was released from imprisonment in 1990 despite having initially been handed a life sentence. At the time of his imprisonment, South Africa was ruled by the white supremacist system of apartheid, in which native black Africans were officially considered inferior in every way to colonial European citizens, also known as Afrikaners. Mandela was an anti-apartheid revolutionary who eventually became the first president of South Africa, and he was initially imprisoned on charges of incitement before being charged with conspiracy to overthrow the state in what is known as the Rivonia Trial.
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  • When Was Napoleon Attacked by a Horde of Rabbits?

    Q: When Was Napoleon Attacked by a Horde of Rabbits?

    A: In 1807, Napoleon was coming off of a high note. He had just signed the Treaty of Tilsit, which ended his war with Russia. To celebrate, he gathered his dignitaries for a rabbit hunt. Little did he know that, in a bizarre twist, he would become "hunted" instead.
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  • What Were Some of the Primary Crops Grown in the New England Colonies in America?

    Q: What Were Some of the Primary Crops Grown in the New England Colonies in America?

    A: Corn formed a majority of the colonial diet. Other native crops included pumpkins, squash and beans. European wheat, barley, oats and peas were also grown. In addition to the large-field crops, family gardens in the colonies contained herbs and vegetables, such as lettuce, parsley, carrots, spinach and turnips. In northern colonies farming produced less than in the southern New England colonies because of a shorter growing season and poor soil.
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  • What Are Ten Facts About Apartheid?

    Q: What Are Ten Facts About Apartheid?

    A: Apartheid is a form of racial segregation that has its roots in South Africa. Under this system of segregation, South Africans were divided into groups of whites and nonwhites. Apartheid was introduced in 1948 under the governance of the National Party, which was a system of government run by all-white officials.
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  • What Was the IQ of Albert Einstein?

    Q: What Was the IQ of Albert Einstein?

    A: Albert Einstein had an IQ of 160. This is the same IQ level as Stephen Hawking. Einstein was born in Germany on March 14, 1879.
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  • Which African Countries Were Never Colonized?

    Q: Which African Countries Were Never Colonized?

    A: Ethiopia and Liberia were the only two African countries that were not colonized. Liberia was founded by freed slaves and Ethiopia resisted Italian attempts at colonization.
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  • What Was the Cause of the Cambodian Genocide?

    Q: What Was the Cause of the Cambodian Genocide?

    A: The Cambodian genocide was caused by Khmer Rouge party leader Pol Pot's attempt to eliminate anyone potentially opposed to his proposed system of labor in a federation of collective farms, according to World Without Genocide. Pol Pot's project was inspired by Maoist-Communist ideals.
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  • How Many People Were on the Titanic When It Sank?

    Q: How Many People Were on the Titanic When It Sank?

    A: Official reports vary, but the consensus is that there were between 2,200 and 2,340 passengers and crew members on board the Titanic when it sank. Of that number, 885 were crew members.
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  • When Did South Africa Gain Independence From Britain?

    Q: When Did South Africa Gain Independence From Britain?

    A: South Africa gained its independence from Great Britain in 1934, though the African National Congress, which was formed 22 years prior to South Africa gaining its independence, did not gain power until 1994.
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  • Did Einstein Help Invent the Atomic Bomb?

    Q: Did Einstein Help Invent the Atomic Bomb?

    A: While Einstein's theories and efforts contributed indirectly, he was not directly involved in building the world's first nuclear bomb. His theory, E=mc2, helps illustrate the energy released in an atomic reaction, but he was not responsible for instructing the United States on how to build a bomb. He did, however, warn President Roosevelt that Nazi Germany was attempting to build an atomic weapon, which influenced the United States' efforts to make their own.
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  • How Long Has the Internet Been Around?

    Q: How Long Has the Internet Been Around?

    A: Generally speaking, the DARPA research project known as ARPANET has been defined as the "beginning" of the Internet, as it was the first instance of resources shared over a wide area network. It first came to life in Sept. 1969, when the IMP server at UCLA came online.
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  • How Were the Settlers in Plymouth County Different Than the Massachusetts Bay Colony Settlers?

    Q: How Were the Settlers in Plymouth County Different Than the Massachusetts Bay Colony Settlers?

    A: The Pilgrims at Plymouth Bay Colony were Calvinists and Puritan Separatists, while the Puritans at Massachusetts Bay Colony were determined to reform the Anglican Church from within. While both were Protestants and Puritans, they had different goals and beliefs.
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  • What Was Popular in 1967?

    Q: What Was Popular in 1967?

    A: In 1967, rock music, peace and acceptance movements, comedic movies for younger audiences, new automobiles and a new style of miniskirt all became popular. Some of these trends remained popular for many years, while others were short trends that ended rather quickly.
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  • Why Is George Washington a Hero?

    Q: Why Is George Washington a Hero?

    A: George Washington became a hero due to his role as commander in chief of the Continental Army. Congress assigned him this position in 1775, and his leadership helped the army defeat the British in the American Revolution.
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  • What Was the Cause of the Nigerian Civil War?

    Q: What Was the Cause of the Nigerian Civil War?

    A: The attempted secession of the southeastern provinces of Nigeria was the cause of the Nigerian Civil War. Another name for this conflict is the Biafran War because those provinces named themselves the Republic of Biafra.
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  • Who Was Nelson Mandela, and What Did He Do?

    Q: Who Was Nelson Mandela, and What Did He Do?

    A: Nelson Mandela (1918-2013) was a president of South Africa and a Nobel Peace Prize recipient. In South Africa, he is often called "Madiba," which was the name of the clan he was born into.
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  • What Were the Causes and Effects of World War II?

    Q: What Were the Causes and Effects of World War II?

    A: Unresolved Tensions From WWI After World War I, Germany was divided with its boundaries redrawn with very little input from Germany, as noted by The History Channel. Liability for reparations was also placed on Germany, causing tension between the countries. Plus, the government in Germany did not willingly sign the treaty.
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  • Who Were the Original Members of the Rat Pack?

    Q: Who Were the Original Members of the Rat Pack?

    A: Many people know the Rat Pack as Frank Sinatra, Sammy Davis, Jr., Dean Martin, Peter Lawford and Joey Bishop. However, the origins of the Rat Pack go back to actor Humphrey Bogart, and Bogart’s wife, the actress Lauren Bacall, and a few of their Hollywood friends.
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  • What Was in the Exercise Room on the Titanic?

    Q: What Was in the Exercise Room on the Titanic?

    A: The RMS Titanic had some of the finest amenities available for its first-class passengers, one of which was a top-of-the-line gymnasium. According to the National Museums Northern Ireland, the first-class exercise room contained “an electric camel, an electric horse, cycling machines and a rowing machine.”
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