Modern Europe

A:

The Titanic set sail for New York from the White Star Dock in Southampton, England, on April 10, 1912. Most of her crew also came from or lived in the area.

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  • How deep did the Titanic sink?

    Q: How deep did the Titanic sink?

    A: After a collision with an iceberg irreparably damaged its hull, the RMS Titanic sank to a depth of 12,500 feet. The wreckage was found in 1985 by Dr. Robert D. Ballard, 370 miles south-southeast of Newfoundland.
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  • What are some of the problems facing Europe today?

    Q: What are some of the problems facing Europe today?

    A: As Europe approaches the second half of the 21st-century's second decade, it faces pressing issues of anti-EU sentiment, sluggish economic growth and high unemployment. While many are calling for a greater degree of integration between the European Union's member-states, growing concerns regarding the region's struggling businesses and sluggish GDP growth are giving rise to Euroscepticism, or a lack of faith in the EU's ability to bring about significant improvements. According to a report released in October of 2013 by the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, 120 million Europeans were at risk of falling into poverty.
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  • How much did it cost to build the Titanic?

    Q: How much did it cost to build the Titanic?

    A: In 1912, the cost to build the Titanic was $7.5 million. In today's economy, that is equivalent to a cost of $400 million. Construction of the Titanic began March 31, 1909.
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  • What kind of work did Albert Einstein do?

    Q: What kind of work did Albert Einstein do?

    A: According to About.com, Albert Einstein started out working as a technical assistant examiner at the Swiss Patent Office in 1902. After his received his doctorate in 1905 and had several articles published, he began to rise as the scientist he is known as today. Starting in 1909, he accepted teaching positions at the University of Zurich, University of Prague and later the University of Berlin.
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  • What did Queen Victoria do that was important?

    Q: What did Queen Victoria do that was important?

    A: Queen Victoria established the modern role of a monarch in a constitutional monarchy and exerted her influence to promote the British Empire's expansion and reforms benefiting the poor, according to the website of The British Monarchy. During her 67-year reign of Britain, the Empire experienced immense social, political and industrial change. Her longevity, combined with her grace and reclusive nature, led to her becoming a national icon of moral strictness.
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  • Why is the Eiffel Tower famous?

    Q: Why is the Eiffel Tower famous?

    A: The Eiffel Tower is famous because it was the tallest structure in the world at the time of its construction in 1889. It has since become a Paris icon and a symbol of romance. More people pay to see the Eiffel Tower each year than any other attraction in the world.
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  • Why was Winston Churchill a good leader?

    Q: Why was Winston Churchill a good leader?

    A: Winston Churchill was widely regarded as a strong, capable leader in large part owing to his ability to inspire others, as well as his gift as an orator and his sustained courage and insight into military and political strategy. Churchill took charge and helped British citizens take heart during the darkest days of World War II. No matter how much the Germans bombed England, he maintained a positive attitude.
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  • What is Queen Elizabeth I famous for?

    Q: What is Queen Elizabeth I famous for?

    A: Elizabeth Tudor was queen of England for 45 years, and her reign is referred to as the Elizabethan era or the Golden Age of England. When she first ascended to the throne, Elizabeth inherited a bankrupt nation, torn by religious strife and threatened by the military power of France and Spain. By her death on March 24, 1603, England had become a major world power in every respect.
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  • Why are there gargoyles in the Notre Dame cathedral?

    Q: Why are there gargoyles in the Notre Dame cathedral?

    A: The gargoyles on Notre Dame cathedral were built as water spouts to prevent damage to the masonry by deflecting rainwater from the sides of the building. After the installation of drain pipes in the 16th century, the gargoyles were merely ornamental.
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  • How long did it take to build the Titanic?

    Q: How long did it take to build the Titanic?

    A: Built in Belfast Ireland, the Titanic took approximately 3 years to complete. Construction began in 1909, and the ship was completed in 1912, the same year as her maiden voyage.
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  • Who were the conquistadors?

    Q: Who were the conquistadors?

    A: The conquistadors were soldiers and explorers from the Portuguese or Spanish Empire that sought out the new world during the Age of Discovery, which began around the 15th century. They were notorious for their use of violence and political manipulation to subdue other cultures and aid in their own exploration.
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  • What caused the Yugoslavian Civil War?

    Q: What caused the Yugoslavian Civil War?

    A: The Yugoslavian Civil War occurred because the country was initially created as a federation of diverse ethnic states, and once central government was no longer strong enough to keep them all together, the patchwork nation began to fall apart. In 1990, Slovenia, Croatia and Macedonia agitated for independence, but Yugoslavian president Slobodan Milosevic refused to address their demands. When Slovenia declared independence, Serbian forces moved in and initiated the war.
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  • What are two outcomes of the Berlin Conference in 1884 and 1885?

    Q: What are two outcomes of the Berlin Conference in 1884 and 1885?

    A: The most notable outcomes of the Berlin Conference in 1884 and 1885 are Articles 34 and 35 of the Berlin Act. These articles address the possession and occupation of the coasts and hinterlands of Africa.
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  • What role did Leon Trotsky play in the Russian Revolution?

    Q: What role did Leon Trotsky play in the Russian Revolution?

    A: In Vladimir Lenin's government in the Russian Revolution, Leon Trotsky first played the role of Commissar for Foreign Affairs and then the leader of the Red Army. In the Bolshevik government, he was second only to Lenin and seemed destined to succeed him until Joseph Stalin outmaneuvered him politically and banished him from the Soviet Union.
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  • How did Napoleon change France?

    Q: How did Napoleon change France?

    A: Napoleon changed France by creating the Napoleonic Code, negotiating a long-term agreement with the Roman Catholic Church and reforming the tax and education systems. Though Napoleon's reign ended in 1815, his reforms lasted well beyond his time in office.
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  • What is East Prussia called now?

    Q: What is East Prussia called now?

    A: In 1945, East Prussia was dissolved, and the lands were distributed among Poland, Russia and Lithuania. As such, there is no single name that refers to the former province as a whole.
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  • What is Prussia called today?

    Q: What is Prussia called today?

    A: Prussia, which was once the main state of the German Empire, is now referred to as the Republic of Germany, with its last-known capital as Berlin and having originated in Brandenburg. It became a substantial European power in 1740 under the leadership of Frederick II of Prussia, who ruled until 1786.
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  • What was the Defenestration of Prague?

    Q: What was the Defenestration of Prague?

    A: The Defenestration of Prague is an incident of Bohemian resistance to the Hapsburg authority that was central to the start of the Thirty Years War. It happened on May 23, 1618. In response to Roman Catholic officials in Bohemia closing Protestant chapels, an assembly of Protestants tried and found guilty the imperial regents of violating the Letter of Majesty. They then threw the men and their secretary out the window.
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  • How did Mexico gain independence from Spain?

    Q: How did Mexico gain independence from Spain?

    A: Mexico gained its independence from Spain when Miguel Hidalgo called for a war against the Spaniards; Mexico won the war in 1821. Before the war was over and Mexico gained its independence, the Spanish army murdered Hidalgo.
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  • Who was Peter the Great, and what did he do?

    Q: Who was Peter the Great, and what did he do?

    A: Peter the Great was the czar of Russia from 1682 to 1725, according to A&E's Biography, and he was responsible for reforming Russia, bringing it into the modern age and setting the stage for Russia to become a world power. Previously, Russia remained isolated from the West and missed out on many of the societal gains that resulted from the Renaissance, a problem Peter corrected during his rule.
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  • How did Napoleon come to dominate most of Europe?

    Q: How did Napoleon come to dominate most of Europe?

    A: Napoleon conquered most of Europe with an array of insightful tactics. He used military strength, political maneuvering, forced alliances, annexation and idealism to bring large swathes of Europe under his control.
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