Exploration & Imperialism

A:

According to the BBC, Sir Douglas Mawson led an expedition to the Antarctic to explore unknown territory and advance scientific knowledge of the continent. He had been offered a place in Robert Falcon Scott's expedition, which was attempting to reach the South Pole first, but Mawson passed on the opportunity in order to lead his own expedition into the area of Antarctica south of Australia.

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  • Who first discovered gold?

    Q: Who first discovered gold?

    A: The discovery of gold cannot be attributed to just one person or one civilization because it is found in all corners of the globe. Historians have found evidence that suggests that gold has been used since 2600 B.C.
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  • Who were the Pilgrims?

    Q: Who were the Pilgrims?

    A: The Pilgrims were a group of approximately 100 people who in 1620 sailed on the Mayflower ship to North America, known then as the New World from England; they were seeking freedom from religious oppression. The party landed at present-day Cape Cod, Mass and created a settlement at Plymouth Harbor.
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  • When did horses arrive in North America?

    Q: When did horses arrive in North America?

    A: The modern horse was introduced to North America in 1519 by Spanish conquistadors. Hernán Cortés brought 15 horses to the mainland, and many of them were granted to settlers in Mexico and New Mexico. Further expeditions brought more horses, and large, wild herds existed in America by the 17th century.
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  • What area did Zebulon Pike explore?

    Q: What area did Zebulon Pike explore?

    A: On his first expedition, Zebulon Pike left St. Louis, Mo., and explored the Mississippi River as far as Leech Lake and Sandy Lake in Minnesota, and on his second expedition Pike traveled westward to explore the sources of the Red River and the Arkansas River, part of the territory of the newly-acquired Louisiana Purchase. Pike's Peak in Colorado, which he climbed partway, is named after him.
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  • What cooking tools did the Pilgrims use during colonial times?

    Q: What cooking tools did the Pilgrims use during colonial times?

    A: Cooking tools used by the Pilgrims included frying pans, kettles, iron pots, wooden spoons and a mortar and pestle. Every cooking tool used during colonial times was brought by the Pilgrims on the Mayflower.
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  • What was the significance of the Louisiana Purchase?

    Q: What was the significance of the Louisiana Purchase?

    A: The significance of the Louisiana Purchase was that it allowed the United States to continue its westward expansion, it more than doubled the size of the U.S. and it kept the U.S. from going to war with France. It was a shrewd business move on Napoleon's part because he needed money for his war with England, and he knew he couldn't keep the Americans out of New Orleans without a fight, which he didn't have the military to cover.
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  • What country did Christopher Columbus attempt to reach?

    Q: What country did Christopher Columbus attempt to reach?

    A: Christopher Columbus attempted to sail for the Far East, to the countries which now make up the continent of Asia. He proposed that it would be faster and easier to reach Asia by sailing west rather than east.
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  • What are some positives and negatives of Columbus' voyages?

    Q: What are some positives and negatives of Columbus' voyages?

    A: Often credited with having "discovered" North America, Christopher Columbus had positive and negative effects on the world. His voyages helped establish new trade routes and bring new goods to England. On the down side, his arrival brought infectious diseases that wiped out Native American populations, and the colonization that followed destroyed thousands of years of Native American culture.
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  • What made the Middle Colonies a good place to settle?

    Q: What made the Middle Colonies a good place to settle?

    A: The Middle Colonies were good places to settle because they had fertile farmland, plenty of sun and rain and natural transportation methods. The Delaware and Hudson River, for example, were ideal bodies of water for transporting produce and crops.
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  • What was the purpose of the Oregon Trail?

    Q: What was the purpose of the Oregon Trail?

    A: The Oregon Trail was a series of trails that led from Missouri to the Columbia River and Willamette Valley. It was used by missionary families, settlers, fur trappers and farmers to open a route of trade. The trails were originally used by Native Americans. During the late 1800s, the Oregon Trail was used for eastward cattle drives. By the 20th century, it became a key part of American iconography.
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  • What mythical creature did Marco Polo claim to find?

    Q: What mythical creature did Marco Polo claim to find?

    A: The Italian explorer Marco Polo was responsible for introducing Europeans to many new discoveries, including some that were far from accurate; when Marco Polo saw a rhinoceros during his travels in Asia, he claimed to have seen a unicorn. Because Marco Polo was not used to seeing some of the non-mythical animals that are native to Asia, he confused what he saw, which included animals such as crocodiles and large snakes, for mythical creatures. Photographic technology had not yet been developed at the time of Marco Polo's 13th-century travels, and the explorer's personal accounts were converted into drawings.
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  • Why was Gandhi called "Mahatma"?

    Q: Why was Gandhi called "Mahatma"?

    A: Gandhi was called Mahatma as a sign of respect for his great character and deeds. The word Mahatma, erroneously considered to be Gandhi's birth name by some in the western society, originates from the Sanskrit words "maha", which means "great," and "atma," which means "soul." Rabindranath Tagore is known as the man who gave him the title.
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  • Who is Ernest Shackleton?

    Q: Who is Ernest Shackleton?

    A: Ernest Shackleton, who was born on Feb. 15, 1874, and died in Jan. 1922, was an Anglo-Irish explorer. He is best known for his trio of expeditions to Antarctica, most notably the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition of 1914 to 1917.
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  • What are pirates?

    Q: What are pirates?

    A: Pirates are people who rob ships and boats at sea. Their aim is to take items of worth, such as jewels and money. Sometimes, pirates board vessels with the intent on taking over the ship itself.
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  • Who was the first person to travel around the world?

    Q: Who was the first person to travel around the world?

    A: The expedition led by Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan was the first to completely circumnavigate the globe, although Magellan himself was unable to finish the trip. He was killed by hostile forces in the Philippines in 1521, leaving his men to make the return trip home without him.
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  • Where did the Pilgrims live?

    Q: Where did the Pilgrims live?

    A: The Pilgrims lived in Plymouth, New England, and they arrived in 1620, according to the Plimoth Plantation, an affiliate program of the Smithsonian Institution. The Pilgrims built their settlement on land that had been cleared by the Wampanoag tribe. This area is now known as Plymouth, Massachusetts.
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  • Why were Lewis and Clark so important?

    Q: Why were Lewis and Clark so important?

    A: Lewis and Clark were important because they undertook the first expedition to cross the western part of the United States all the way to the Pacific Ocean. During their expedition, they explored the newly acquired lands of the Louisiana Purchase, surveyed and mapped the land, established a U.S. presence for legal purposes, made friendly contact with many Native American tribes, and scientifically studied local flora and fauna.
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  • What is the impact of the exploration of Christopher Columbus?

    Q: What is the impact of the exploration of Christopher Columbus?

    A: As History.com points out, though Christopher Columbus did not discover the New World, one of the impacts of his exploration was the opening of the North America to settlement and exploitation. Another impact was the devastation of the native population through disease, subjugation and environmental deterioration.
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  • How did Napoleon affect Europe?

    Q: How did Napoleon affect Europe?

    A: Napoleon's influence on Europe included the spread of nationalism, shifts in world power, major redrawing of political boundaries and the diffusion of Napoleonic ideas of governance. The political climate of Europe following Napoleon's downfall was very different than it had been prior to his rise to power. The political forces and ideologies resulting from the Napoleonic era influenced European politics in the following two centuries, contributing to the World Wars.
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  • Where was the first Spanish settlement in North America?

    Q: Where was the first Spanish settlement in North America?

    A: According to the National Humanities Center, the first Spanish settlement in North America was La Isabela (Isabella), named for the Spanish queen. It was located on the northern coast of Hispaniola, now known as the Dominican Republic.
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  • What is the El Cazador shipwreck?

    Q: What is the El Cazador shipwreck?

    A: The El Cazador shipwreck is ship lost at sea that was found in 1993 by fisherman Jerry Murphy in the Gulf of Mexico. The El Cazador disappeared in 1784 with 19 tons of Spanish silver reales.
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