Ancient Rome

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One major accomplishment of Augustus Caesar was that he restored and maintained peace in the city of Rome, also known as the Pax Romana. Prior to Augustus, Rome was a city plagued with civil disobedience, class wars and greed.

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  • What was one of Emperor Constantine's accomplishments?

    Q: What was one of Emperor Constantine's accomplishments?

    A: Constantine is known for being the first Roman emperor to accept and promote the Christian religion and was largely responsible for how prominent it became during the Middle Ages. He also established a new Roman capital he called New Rome, or Constantinople, as it was commonly called by his subjects, in an old Greek town previously called Byzantium.
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  • How far did the Roman Empire stretch?

    Q: How far did the Roman Empire stretch?

    A: At the peak of the Roman Empire's reach, around A.D. 117, the Empire stretched as far north as modern Scotland, stretched down through Europe east into Asia as far as the border between modern day Iraq and Iran, with its southern reaches extending into northern Africa. At its height, the Roman Empire had geographic stake in up to 48 modern-day countries, including the Palestinian territories.
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  • What were Emperor Nero's achievements?

    Q: What were Emperor Nero's achievements?

    A: The Roman Emperor Nero is one of the most controversial figures in the history of the Roman Empire. During the early years of Nero's reign he lowered taxes and made positive changes to slavery laws. One of the most notable events that occurred during the later years was the burning of Rome in 64 A.D.
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  • Why did the Barbarians invade Rome?

    Q: Why did the Barbarians invade Rome?

    A: Gauls, Celts and other groups invaded Rome for many different reasons, including pressure from the distant Huns from the East. Rome had changed since its early years of glory, progressing from a republic governed by citizen-soldiers into an elitist bureaucracy governing a mostly idle citizenry. It had grown soft and weak, according to the website for the Department of Economics of San Jose State University.
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  • What does Caesar tell Mark Antony to do to Calpurnia?

    Q: What does Caesar tell Mark Antony to do to Calpurnia?

    A: Caesar told Marc Antony, who is running in the Lupercalia celebrations, to touch Calpurnia, Caesar's wife, as he passes by. The Romans believed that women touched or whipped during this celebration would become fertile.
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  • How did the fall of Rome affect Europe?

    Q: How did the fall of Rome affect Europe?

    A: The fall of the Roman Empire plunged Europe into the Dark Ages and decentralized the region. The Imperial system in Rome was replaced with a loose-knit group of kings and princes throughout Europe.
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  • What was the importance of the Edict of Milan?

    Q: What was the importance of the Edict of Milan?

    A: The Edict of Milan is considered an influential factor in the fall of the Roman Empire. Many have argued that the rise of the Christian faith, which was a direct result of the Edict of Milan, contributed to the decline of Rome. The Roman emperors Constantine I and Licinius formed the edict in Milan in February 313.
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  • What materials were used to build the Colosseum?

    Q: What materials were used to build the Colosseum?

    A: The Romans constructed the Colosseum of a primitive form of concrete. They made concrete using lime, which they burned to create quicklime, water and volcanic ash. The volcanic ash served as the aggregate and is likely the reason Roman concrete, which was 10 times weaker than the concrete used in 2014, remains after almost 2,000 years.
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  • What volcano wiped out Pompeii?

    Q: What volcano wiped out Pompeii?

    A: Mount Vesuvius erupted in August of 79 A.D. and destroyed the city of Pompeii. The entire city was buried in stones and ash until its rediscovery in the 1740s. Estimates place the death toll at more than 15,000 people.
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  • What were some of the contributions of Ancient Rome?

    Q: What were some of the contributions of Ancient Rome?

    A: Ancient Rome made major contributions in the areas of architecture, government, and medicine among others. The Ancient Roman culture was one of the most influential empires of its time. Many of their contributions can be seen in the world in modern times.
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  • Why is Rome called the Eternal City?

    Q: Why is Rome called the Eternal City?

    A: Rome is called the Eternal City because ancient Romans believed that no matter what happened to the world or how many empires came and collapsed, Rome would go on forever. The enduring quality of the city continues even to this day, as Rome remains one of the most vibrant cities and a leading tourist destination in Europe.
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  • What countries were in the Roman Empire?

    Q: What countries were in the Roman Empire?

    A: The modern countries of Portugal, Spain, Andorra, England, France, Monaco, Luxembourg, Belgium, the Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Italy, San Marino, Malta, Austria and the Czech Republic. In addition, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Albania, Greece, Macedonia, Romania, Bulgaria, Turkey, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Syria, Iraq, Kuwait, Cyprus, Lebanon, Jordan, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, Sudan, Lybia, Tunisia, Algeria and Morocco were all part of the Roman Empire.
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  • Who was the Roman counterpart to the Greek goddess Athena?

    Q: Who was the Roman counterpart to the Greek goddess Athena?

    A: The Roman counterpart to the Greek goddess Athena was Minerva. Famous for her keen wit and wisdom, she is the patron goddess of arts and crafts.
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  • Did Julius Caesar have any medical problems?

    Q: Did Julius Caesar have any medical problems?

    A: Scholars believe that Julius Caesar had epilepsy, and he may have suffered from absence seizures throughout his childhood and teenage years. Other experts maintain that he had migraines, while others claim he was plagued with hypoglycemia, a disease which can lead to seizures.
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  • Who conspired to kill Julius Caesar?

    Q: Who conspired to kill Julius Caesar?

    A: The plot to assassinate Julius Caesar involved up to 60 men, and the conspiracy was led by Cassius Longinus and Marcus Brutus, Caesar's brother-in-law. Caesar was attacked and stabbed to death on March 15, 44 B.C. as he walked into a meeting of his senate.
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  • What were Roman coins made from?

    Q: What were Roman coins made from?

    A: Ancient Roman coins were made from various materials. When the Romans first started using coins, they made coins from valuable metals such as bronze, gold and silver. The Romans first produced bronze coins, then silver coins and gold coins. The Romans rarely used gold coins, but they were produced.
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  • What did gladiators wear?

    Q: What did gladiators wear?

    A: Gladiators wore armor assigned to them based on a system of classes. The armor complemented the weapons and other equipment they were assigned. Because most gladiators were male slaves sworn to fight to the death if necessary, they did not usually own or wear anything that did not directly serve this purpose.
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  • How long did the Roman Empire last?

    Q: How long did the Roman Empire last?

    A: The Roman Empire began with the crowning of Gaius Octavian Thurinus in 31 B.C. and fell to the German Goths in A.D. 476, for a total of 507 years. The Byzantine Empire, Rome's eastern half, did not fall until the Ottoman Turks conquered Constantinople in 1453.
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  • What is the Roman name for Dionysus?

    Q: What is the Roman name for Dionysus?

    A: Bacchus is the Roman name for the Greek god Dionysus. Dionysus was the son of the Greek god Zeus (or Jupiter, to use his Roman equivalent) and a mortal woman named Semele. Dionysus was the Greek god of wine, the grape harvest, ecstasy and madness.
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  • What were some accomplishments of Augustus Caesar?

    Q: What were some accomplishments of Augustus Caesar?

    A: One major accomplishment of Augustus Caesar was that he restored and maintained peace in the city of Rome, also known as the Pax Romana. Prior to Augustus, Rome was a city plagued with civil disobedience, class wars and greed.
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  • What are the characteristics of Roman architecture?

    Q: What are the characteristics of Roman architecture?

    A: Some of the most important characteristics of Roman architecture include arches, columns and the use of marble and limestone. Roman architects were heavily influenced by early Greek architects, particularly in their use of Doric, Corinthian and Ionic columns.
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