Ancient Greece

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The culture of ancient Greece produced many accomplishments, such as art that remains among the world's finest, the first valid approaches to science, the first works of literature that remain in the canon of classics and significant contributions to mathematics. Later societies relied on Greek discoveries in mathematics and science all the way up until the Renaissance and even until the Industrial Revolution in many instances.

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  • How did Aristotle change the world?

    Q: How did Aristotle change the world?

    A: Aristotle changed the world as he was the first to organize human knowledge into categories, some of which are still used in modern times. These categories include biology, mathematics and ethics.
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  • What were the achievements of ancient Greece?

    Q: What were the achievements of ancient Greece?

    A: The culture of ancient Greece produced many accomplishments, such as art that remains among the world's finest, the first valid approaches to science, the first works of literature that remain in the canon of classics and significant contributions to mathematics. Later societies relied on Greek discoveries in mathematics and science all the way up until the Renaissance and even until the Industrial Revolution in many instances.
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  • Why were the ancient Olympic games held?

    Q: Why were the ancient Olympic games held?

    A: The early Olympic games were held as a way to honor the Olympian gods. They also aimed to show the physical qualities of young athletes and encourage good relations between the competing Greek cities.
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  • Who was the Greek god of protection?

    Q: Who was the Greek god of protection?

    A: In Greek mythology, there was no single god in charge of protection. Rather, people would worship a variety of gods to assure protection against different threats. Worship itself was a way of protecting oneself from harm.
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  • When did Romulus die?

    Q: When did Romulus die?

    A: Romulus, the co-founder of Rome along with his brother Remus, went missing sometime during 717 B.C. and is presumed to have died around this time. The exact cause of his death is unknown, although there are many myths about how he died, according to Ancient History Encyclopedia.
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  • What language did the Ancient Greeks speak?

    Q: What language did the Ancient Greeks speak?

    A: The Ancient Greeks spoke Ancient Greek with three different major dialects: Aeolic, Doric and Ionic. They were the first Europeans to both read and write with an alphabet. This alphabet eventually led to the development of all modern European languages.
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  • What caused the Trojan War?

    Q: What caused the Trojan War?

    A: The Trojan War began when the Trojan Prince Paris kidnapped Helen, the wife of Menelaus, king of Sparta. He was assisted by Aphrodite, who had promised him Helen, the most beautiful woman in the world, as a reward for siding with her in a competition against the goddesses Hera and Athena.
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  • How long did the Trojan War last?

    Q: How long did the Trojan War last?

    A: The Trojan War lasted slightly more than 10 years. During the first nine years, the Greeks fought against the Trojans and its neighbors to attempt to cut off Troy's supplies and gain an advantage.
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  • What did the ancient Greeks believe in?

    Q: What did the ancient Greeks believe in?

    A: The ancient Greeks were polytheistic and believed in a pantheon of Gods, some of whom were more powerful than others. Though Zeus was the king of the gods, he was not omnipotent, and other deities controlled specific aspects of nature and human endeavor.
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  • Where did Euclid live?

    Q: Where did Euclid live?

    A: The life of Euclid is not well documented, but it is known that he lived in Athens, Greece for a time. He is also known to have taught in Alexandria, Egypt.
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  • What happened at the Battle of Marathon?

    Q: What happened at the Battle of Marathon?

    A: At Marathon, Greek forces successfully defended a Persian invasion. The Battle of Marathon was one of history's earliest recorded battles, occurring in September 490 B.C., nine years after the beginning of the Greco-Persian Wars. The battle is also considered a turning point in the wars, as the Persians were forced to retreat and end their first attempt at invasion.
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  • What is the Roman Coliseum?

    Q: What is the Roman Coliseum?

    A: The Roman Colosseum was built in A.D. 75 and finished in A.D. 82 in Rome for gladiatorial competitions as well as other brutal contests involving men and animals. The Colosseum held up to 50,000 people with four tiers of marble seats. The Colosseum is an oval-shaped building made of stone and concrete.
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  • What are the dates during which the Trojan War took place?

    Q: What are the dates during which the Trojan War took place?

    A: Historians and archaeologists have placed the Trojan war some time in the 13th century B.C. Because there are so many different accounts of the Trojan War, it is difficult to determine the exact dates on which it took place.
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  • When did Alexander the Great come to power?

    Q: When did Alexander the Great come to power?

    A: Alexander the Great came to power in 336 B.C. He was the son of Philip II, the King of Macedonia. After Philip II was assassinated, Alexander became King Alexander III.
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  • What were the prizes in the ancient Olympics?

    Q: What were the prizes in the ancient Olympics?

    A: When an athlete was crowned champion of his sport during the ancient Greek Olympics, his prize was a wreath of olive leaves that were cut from the trees in Zeus' sacred grove in Olympia, as well as having a statue of himself erected in Olympia. The prizes were quite minimal, as the honor associated with winning was by far more important.
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  • Where was Pythagoras educated?

    Q: Where was Pythagoras educated?

    A: Pythagoras was educated in Tyre, Samos and Miletus, which is present-day Syria and Asia Minor, as well as Egypt. He later founded his own mystery school in Croton, which is southern Italy.
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  • What were the achievements of Socrates?

    Q: What were the achievements of Socrates?

    A: Socrates is acknowledged as the father of Western philosophy, a great teacher who taught Plato, who in his turn taught Aristotle, Alexander the Great's teacher. Beyond philosophy, Socrates was a brave and skilled soldier who once saved the life of Athenian general Alcibiades.
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  • In mythology, what are Athena's special powers?

    Q: In mythology, what are Athena's special powers?

    A: Athena's special powers are wisdom and arts and crafts, such as agriculture, navigation, spinning, weaving and needlework. She is the goddess of war, but she focuses on strategy instead of bloodshed.
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  • What is a short summary of "The Iliad"?

    Q: What is a short summary of "The Iliad"?

    A: According to SparkNotes, "The Iliad" chronicles events during the final year of the battle for Troy, centering around the conflict between the Greek hero Achilles and the Trojan hero Hector. After initially sitting out of the fight, Achilles becomes enraged at Hector's slaying of a dear friend and lays waste to the Trojan forces before killing Hector himself.
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  • What is a symbol of Prometheus, the Greek god?

    Q: What is a symbol of Prometheus, the Greek god?

    A: There is no specific symbol associated with Prometheus, but he is most closely associated with fire. Prometheus was the immortal who gave mankind the gift of fire in direct opposition to Zeus' will.
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  • What did Medusa represent?

    Q: What did Medusa represent?

    A: According to the University of Illinois, Medusa represented a variety of things including the face of the warrior possessed by battle frenzy, and in Christian symbolism Medusa represented the dreaded enemy and death. At first glance, the Medusa head appears to be of complete negativity.
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