Q:

How did Mexico change as a result of the Mexican Revolution?

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Quick Answer

The most notable changes in Mexico after the revolution were arguably the rise of the National Revolutionary Party known in modern times as the Institutional Revolutionary Party, the end of the feudal hacienda system, the introduction of industrial capitalist and agrarian socialist policies such as commercial and collective farms, the centralization and streamlining of the government even as presidential term limits were introduced and a boom in Mexican art and literature. The Mexican Revolution lasted from 1910 to around 1920 and included multiple conflicts among many factions striving for control over the country.

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Full Answer

While the tenure of Álvaro Obregón as president from 1920 to 1924 ostensibly ended the Mexican Revolution, conflict in the country continued on a smaller scale for the next decade, including the Cristero War from 1926 to 1929 and the assassination of Obregón in 1928 after he won a second presidential term. Insurrections and political violence never wholly left Mexico as a result of the revolution. One example of this is the Zapatista revolt in the 1990s, which took its name from the revolutionary figure Emiliano Zapatista.

The revolution also led to a flourishing of culture in Mexico. Corridos, or folk songs detailing local events, grew in popularity as a result of the revolution, while the Mexican Muralist Movement was the result of an attempt to educate the largely illiterate common people through murals depicting the history of the country. Writers like Mariano Azuela also created some of Latin America's most celebrated literature by exploring the events of the revolution.

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