History

A:

The Greek astronomer Hipparchus was the first to propose a day divided into 24 equal hours. Hipparchus standardized this system from the Egyptians, who also divided the day into 24 hours but did not use a standard length for each hour.

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    • Who won the Opium War between China and Great Britain?

      Q: Who won the Opium War between China and Great Britain?

      A: Great Britain won the Opium War against China. Their victory created foreign spheres of influence in China, allowed Great Britain to take possession of Hong Kong, opened China to European influence and created a drug epidemic in southeastern Asia.
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    • What was the role of women in ancient China?

      Q: What was the role of women in ancient China?

      A: Women in ancient China lived oppressed lives, and their roles centered around caring for their husbands, cleaning, cooking and looking after their kids. The women of ancient China were expected to bear many children, and most of them felt pressure from their husbands to bear a son despite its being beyond their control.
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    • What are some facts about the Zhou Dynasty?

      Q: What are some facts about the Zhou Dynasty?

      A: Although historians do not agree on the exact starting time, the Zhou dynasty in China lasted approximately from 1046 to 221 B.C. and is the longest dynasty in the history of the nation. It is also called the Chou dynasty. Under this dynasty, most of China operated under one government for the first time.
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    • What were ancient China's natural resources?

      Q: What were ancient China's natural resources?

      A: The prodigious land area of ancient China harbored resources like coal, drinking water, numerous minerals and plant and animal life. China is the biggest producer of salt on Earth, with 17 million tons annually. There are 760 billion tons of coal located in China's Shanxi region, and the 3 trillion cubic meters of rainfall and river water rank 6th in the world.
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    • What weapons did the Babylonians use?

      Q: What weapons did the Babylonians use?

      A: The ancient Babylonians used sharpened weapons such as sickle swords, socketed axes, spears, and the Egyptian-derived bladed mace, as well as clubs and staffs, and projectiles flung from war slings. The Babylonians were a Bronze Age people, so the bladed weapons they used were made of a softer metal than later civilization's iron and steel. This made them less effective in battle than iron and iron-alloy based weapons, as iron is harder and harder blades can take a sharper point.
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    • What was ancient Hebrew civilization like?

      Q: What was ancient Hebrew civilization like?

      A: Little is known about the oldest eras of ancient Hebrew civilization because the culture was nomadic. The most distinct and long-lasting elements of ancient Hebrew civilization lay not in its architectural, artistic or diplomatic contributions but in the focus of the people on a monotheistic God who was radically different from the gods worshipped by most ancient peoples.
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    • Who invented the arch?

      Q: Who invented the arch?

      A: It is believed that the Sumerians invented the arch somewhere around 6000 B.C. The Romans, however, receive much of the credit for perfecting the design.
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    • What was the first instrument ever made?

      Q: What was the first instrument ever made?

      A: The oldest musical instrument is the bone flute and this instrument dates back 40,000 years. The assembly of bird bones are responsible for this ancient instrument.
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    • When were watches invented?

      Q: When were watches invented?

      A: Wristwatches were first officially invented in 1868 when a watch was created for the Countess of Hungary. Prior to the first official wristwatch, pocket watches were adapted to be worn on the wrist as early as 1570.
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    • How does the telegraph work?

      Q: How does the telegraph work?

      A: Telegraph keys are switches in electrical circuits that power on the current. When the operator taps out the signals for a word, the switch finishes a circuit, permitting electricity to continue around it. At the other end of the line, the recipient watches a pointer or dial indicating the different patterns of code, listens to a buzzer or reads the print out from a device.
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    • Who discovered mitochondria?

      Q: Who discovered mitochondria?

      A: Robert Altmann discovered mitochondria in 1886, thinking that he was seeing parasites. Altmann called his discovery "bioblasts" and posited that they were found in almost all cells. His ideas laid the groundwork for further discoveries by scientists.
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    • When did Nikola Tesla discover free energy?

      Q: When did Nikola Tesla discover free energy?

      A: Nikola Tesla designed his "Power Tower" in the early 20th century as a way to create and provide free energy for the entire planet. Although his idea never came to fruition, he began construction of the tower in 1901.
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    • What was the job of a medieval knight?

      Q: What was the job of a medieval knight?

      A: Medieval knights were the professional warrior class of Europe, responsible for defending their feudal lord's territory from rival lords and keeping the local serfdom in line with the lord's rule. Knights were frequently members of the noble class, with the title inherited through the father, but it was also a title granted as a reward for chivalrous deeds. In the late medieval period, noble and warrior classes became more static.
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    • What were the effects of the Crusades?

      Q: What were the effects of the Crusades?

      A: Two major effects of the Crusades were that the kings' authority increased and the Europeans learned about new things from the Muslims they encountered. During the Crusades, the kings increased taxes to fund the cause. Many peasants also left their land to fight, and when they died, the land went to the king. With large amounts of money and land coming in, the kings gained power.
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    • Why did The Crusades take place?

      Q: Why did The Crusades take place?

      A: The Crusades were a series of holy wars fueled by two major causes: the Pope's desire to expand the Holy Roman Empire and the reclamation of the Holy Land. In the 11th century, Christians and Muslims were at odds over the ownership of Jerusalem, a holy site for both Christianity and Islam.
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    • How tall was Genghis Khan?

      Q: How tall was Genghis Khan?

      A: There is no definitive account of Ghengis Khan's height. Descriptions simply describe him as tall. Tall is likely relevant, however. The average height of man during the time in which Ghengis Khan lived was just under 5 foot 7 inches, so anyone taller than this average could be considered tall.
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    • What are facts about Mansa Musa?

      Q: What are facts about Mansa Musa?

      A: Mansa Musa assumed the position of ruler of Mali during the 14th century, and later embarked on a journey to Mecca, becoming the first African ruler to do so. Mansa Musa was born in 1280 A.D., and died in 1337. His life achievements included promoting the Muslim religion, and supporting unprecedented growth of the arts and education.
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    • How did people try to avoid the Black Death?

      Q: How did people try to avoid the Black Death?

      A: Between 1328 and 1351, the bubonic plague, commonly known as the Black Death, killed approximately one third of the population of Europe. The widespread nature of the disease, along with its horrific symptoms, inspired Europeans to go to any lengths to avoid it.
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