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Why would a new blood thinner replace warfarin?

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Quick Answer

Doctors sometimes replace warfarin with newer-generation blood-thinning drugs that are as effective as warfarin without its drawbacks, such as the need for frequent blood tests that regulate dosing, according to Loyola Medicine. Newer drugs do not require users to modify their diets like they do when taking warfarin.

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Full Answer

One of the biggest disadvantages of warfarin is the need for close monitoring of doses, notes Loyola Medicine. Too much warfarin puts a patient at risk of brain hemorrhage, but too much is ineffective in preventing the blood clots that cause stroke. Some patients taking warfarin must have their blood drawn as often as twice weekly during therapy to monitor and adjust dosing, and they must limit the amount of vitamin K in their diets. Newer drugs do not require this intense monitoring or dietary restrictions.

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