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What are some treatments for CIDP?

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Quick Answer

Treatments for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy include corticosteroids such as prednisone, which are prescribed alone or with immunosuppressant drugs, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The patient may also undergo plasma exchange, intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and physiotherapy to improve function, mobility and muscle strength and minimize joint distortion and shrinking of tendons and muscles.

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Full Answer

CIDP is a rare neurological disorder that causes inflammation of peripheral nerves and nerve roots and destruction of the myelin sheath, which is the fatty protective covering that wraps around the nerves. This affects the transmission speed of nerve signals, leading to loss of nerve fibers, explains WebMD. The patient therefore suffers progressive weakness and impaired motor and sensory function, especially in the legs and arms. The sensory and motor impairments affect both sides of the body.

The symptoms of CIDP include fatigue, tingling or numbness starting from the fingers and toes, loss of deep tendon reflexes, abnormal sensations, and weakness of the legs and arms, notes the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Patients with hand and forearm weakness have problems with activities such as picking up coins and pencils, fastening buttons, and combing hair, while those with leg weakness exhibit a clumsy gait, have difficulty standing still and can trip on uneven ground, according to HealthCentral.

CIDP is considered the chronic counterpart of Guillain-Barre syndrome, explains the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

CIDP can occur in both genders at any age, but is more common in men than women and in young adults, says the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

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