Q:

How do you treat hip pain associated with bursitis?

A:

Quick Answer

The hip pain associated with bursitis is treated by managing the inflammation of the bursa membrane, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Most often, this is accomplished through non-surgical means, such as activity changes, NSAID medications, physical therapy, steroid shots and assistive devices, such as canes and crutches.

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Full Answer

NSAID medications, such as ibuprofen, and steroid shots can be used only in limited applications because both can have negative side effects with overuse, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. When none of these treatments work to ease the bursitis, surgery is then used to remove the bursa. This removes the inflamed tissue and leaves the hip functioning normally. Recovery from bursa removal surgery is usually very quick, and patients are often able to stand and move around on the same day as the surgery.

Bursae are small sacs of jelly-like material located throughout the body, and they act as buffers between soft tissues and bones, particularly at the joints, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. The most common bursa to become inflamed is known as the greater trochanter, and it covers the bony point of the hip. Bursitis there generally manifests as a pain at the point of the hip, and it usually spreads down along the outer thigh.

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