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What are synarthrotic joints?

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Quick Answer

Synarthrotic joints are those that prevent the bones from moving, according to Georgia Highlands College. These joints can be identified by noting that the bone edges are very close together or interlocking.

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Examples of synarthrotic joints include gomphoses, synostoses, synchondroses and sutures. Gomphoses joints are where a peg fits into a socket, and an example is the teeth sockets. In synostoses, the two separate bones become fused together. An example of this is how the cranial bones of infants eventually fuse as the child ages. Sutures are a type of synarthrotic joint made of fibrous tissue that connect the bones of the skull, and synchondroses joints are made up of cartilage.

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