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What are some symptoms of sensory integration disorder?

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Quick Answer

Symptoms of sensory integration disorder vary greatly depending on the patient, explains WebMD. Some people with sensory integration disorder are oversensitive to their environments, which can result in screaming, hiding or vomiting, while others ignore their environments completely. Sensory integration disorder can affect one sense or multiple senses. Some patients with sensory integration disorder are uncoordinated, are not interested in engaging in play or conversation, and bump into objects easily.

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Full Answer

Infants and toddlers with sensory integration disorder may have difficulty eating and sleeping, according to the Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation. Other symptoms include delayed mastery of crawling, walking, standing or running, resisting cuddling, and poor balance. Some infants and toddlers do not vocalize appropriately for their age group. They may avoid playing with toys and not have the skills to calm themselves. Some may not notice pain or react slowly when hurt.

School-age children with sensory integration disorder may have difficulty reading out loud, writing by hand or speaking out loud, states the Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation. They may have difficulty with tasks that require motor ability, appear clumsy, and have difficulty performing certain tasks. Other school-age children with sensory integration disorder may crave tackling and wrestling with others and may constantly be in motion. Some school-age children may overreact to certain smells, noises or touch.

Adults with sensory integration disorder may find they have sensitivity to things that stimulate their senses, notes the Sensory Processing Disorder Foundation. They may also find that they misinterpret questions, have low reading comprehension and have difficulty completing new tasks.

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