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What are symptoms of rotavirus in adults?

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Quick Answer

The Mayo Clinic states that rotavirus symptoms in adults include fever, vomiting and watery diarrhea. These symptoms usually subside without a doctor’s care. However, individuals who cannot keep liquids down for a period of 24 hours, experience frequent vomiting for two days, vomit blood, experience dehydration or have a fever of more than 103 degrees Fahrenheit should contact a doctor.

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Full Answer

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, explains that the name rotavirus originates from the Latin word rota, which means wheel. When seen by an electron microscope, the disease appears to have wheel-like features. The rotavirus is transmitted through contaminated food, water, surfaces and hands. When a person is exposed to the rotavirus, it takes two days for the symptoms to start showing. The watery diarrhea and vomiting last three to eight days. Since the rotavirus is not a bacteria, it is not treatable with antibiotics. Treatment of the rotavirus is limited to oral rehydration to avoid becoming dehydrated. An individual is at highest risk for the rotavirus from December to June. Frequent hand washing is one way to prevent the virus from spreading. For infants, the CDC states getting one of the rotavirus vaccines is the best preventative measure. As of 2014, there are two vaccines that have been approved in the United States for infants, the RotaTeq and the Rotarix. These vaccines are 85 to 98 percent effective.

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