What does a stroke feel like?


Quick Answer

The symptoms of a stroke include feeling numb or weak on one side of the body; some people report not being able to move a hand, leg or the face, according to EverydayHealth. Stroke symptoms also include speech troubles, trouble understanding what people are saying, trouble with coordination that is limited to one side of the body, double vision and an intense headache that develops suddenly.

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Full Answer

Many people experiencing stroke will find it difficult to talk; they may struggle to find words, have slurred speech or may be unable to speak altogether. They may also have trouble understanding what is being said to them by other people, states EverydayHealth.

According to EverydayHealth, someone experiencing a stroke may have feelings of nausea, and they may stumble and lack coordination. They may think that they're speaking but not be able to speak, and they may be aware of what is happening but lack the ability to do anything about it.

The American Stroke Association notes that one way to remember the signs of a sudden stroke is to remember the acronym FAST. "F" stands for face drooping, and may be characterized by an uneven smile. "A" stands for arm weakness; if one of the arms drifts downward when the arms or raised, then a stroke may be underway. "S" stands for speech difficulty, and "T" stands for "Time to call 9-1-1." As EverydayHealth notes, there is only a three-hour window of time for treating a stroke successfully.

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