Q:

When someone donates blood, are they tested for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)?

A:

Quick Answer

Someone who donates blood is not directly tested for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) during the donation process, but the blood is screened for some diseases that are sexually transmitted, WebMD states. In addition, screening questions look into the donor's sexual history.

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Full Answer

Before donating blood, the donor answers questions about unprotected sex. If their answers indicate that they cannot safely donate, the phlebotomist may not take their blood. Individuals who are at high risk of HIV cannot donate blood. All blood donations are screened for some diseases that are sexually transmittable. This includes HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C. If these STDs are present, the blood cannot be used.

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Related Questions

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    What are all the known STDs?

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    Chancroid, chlamydia, genital warts, gonorrhea and hepatitis B are examples of sexually transmitted diseases, according to Planned Parenthood. These diseases spread when a person passes an infection to someone else during a form of sexual contact. Herpes, HIV, AIDS, human papillomavirus, and molluscum contagiosum are other STDs. Many people with these infections do not have any symptoms or signs of disease. More examples of STDs include pelvic inflammatory disease, pubic lice, scabies, syphilis and trichomoniasis.

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    Where can you get tested for STDs?

    A:

    Many doctor's offices, most health departments and some clinics offer testing for sexually transmitted diseases, or STDs. It is important for a person who suspects he has an STD to get tested as soon as possible. The CDC estimates that 19 million new cases of STDs are diagnosed annually.

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    How can you tell if you have an STD?

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    Sexually transmitted diseases present symptoms that may include irregular periods, fever, genital itching, nausea, burning during urination, fatigue and open sores on the mouth or genitals, notes Laura Berman, Ph.D. for EverydayHealth. Many STDs go undetected and remain dormant in the body with no symptoms at all, according to WebMD.

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