Q:

What are the rules of being kosher?

A:

Quick Answer

The rules of eating kosher dictate which types of meat, fish and fowl can be eaten; how they should be slaughtered and cooked; and how they can be served. Rules also apply to foods such as produce and grains. As long as they are free of bugs, which are not kosher, all fruits, grains and vegetables are kosher except grapes and grape products, which must be made under Jewish supervision.

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Full Answer

The basic laws of eating kosher state that of land animals, only those that have cloven hooves and chew their cud can be eaten. They also must be free of disease, slaughtered according to a certain method that includes removing veins and skin, and immediately draining the blood.

Of seafood, only fish that have fins and scales can be eaten. Regarding poultry: domesticated birds, such as geese, ducks, turkey and chicken, can be eaten, but birds of prey cannot.

Kosher milk and eggs must come from kosher animals. It is not kosher to cook, serve or eat meat and dairy together, to cook meat and fish together, or to serve meat and fish on the same plate. Foods that cannot be combined also can't be cooked in the same pots, even at different times. There must be separate sets of pots, pans, dishes and utensils for meat and for dairy foods, for example.

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