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What are some reasons for having your tonsils removed?

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Quick Answer

Doctors may remove a patient's tonsils due to recurring tonsillitis, enlarged tonsils and bleeding of the tonsils, according to Mayo Clinic. Patients who have recurring strep throat episodes that do not respond to antibiotics may also undergo tonsil removal, says WebMD. Other diseases, such as tonsil stones and cancer, may necessitate a tonsillectomy, reports the Ear, Nose & Throat Associates.

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Full Answer

Doctors often recommend a tonsillectomy if a patient has had more than seven episodes of tonsillitis within a year, more than five episodes a year in two years or more than three episodes a year in three years, states Mayo Clinic. Doctors also perform a tonsillectomy if the bacterial infection that causes tonsillitis does not respond to antibiotic treatment or if the infection causes a tonsillar abscess that does not improve with treatment or drainage.

Patients who have had several episodes of strep throat in a year that do not respond to antibiotic treatment may also undergo a tonsillectomy, reports WebMD. If the tonsils become too big, they may cause complications, such as sleep apnea, difficulty breathing and difficulty swallowing, according to Mayo Clinic. Removing the tonsils often helps solve these complications.

In certain instances, doctors recommend a tonsillectomy to deal with recurrent bleeding near the tonsils, explains Mayo Clinic. They may also recommend a tonsillectomy for a biopsy if they suspect cancer, according to WebMD.

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