Q:

What are porcelain crowns?

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Quick Answer

Porcelain crowns are used to replace a damaged tooth, replicating the form and function of the natural tooth. The crown replaces the entire exterior of the tooth down past the gum line.

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Full Answer

Porcelain crowns are used for multiple reasons. Crowns can act as a cover to protect a weakened tooth from further damage. Crowns offer protection to a tooth where a cavity filling is large and is overtaking the space in the tooth.

Teeth do not necessarily need to be damaged in order to use a porcelain crown. Discolored or crooked teeth can be covered with crowns to make them more cosmetically appealing.

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Related Questions

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    What is a dental crown?

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    How were dental crowns originally made?

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