Q:

Why do periods hurt?

A:

Quick Answer

Most women experience painful periods when the womb's muscular wall contracts and presses against the blood vessels, which, in turn, restricts the flow of oxygen to the womb, causing pain that can spread to the back and thighs. Women in their 30s and 40s may experience pain because of different conditions in the pelvis and the womb. Painful periods are common in teenagers, and they tend to get less painful as a person grows older, as stated by Patient.

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Full Answer

Pain starts when bleeding begins and can last for 48 to 72 hours. It may occur when the womb's wall contracts and presses against the nearby vessels, which restricts the supply of oxygen to the womb and causes pain. Pain that is caused by problems in the pelvis and the womb is referred to as secondary dysmenorrhea.

Some research claims that up to 90 percent of women experience pain during their menstrual periods, as stated by the NHS. Each woman may be affected differently, making it hard to categorize period pain. Pain that is not caused by problems in the womb or pelvis is called primary dysmenorrhea, and tends to get better as a person gets older.

Fortunately, painful periods can be treated at home without seeking medical attention since they are natural. A person can take a hot bath to get rid of the pain. Paracetamol can be used to relieve the pain. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, also help in easing the pain. A person can visit a doctor if the pain becomes severe and interferes with their normal activities.

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