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Why are people who feel dizzy when they stand more likely to develop heart failure?

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Quick Answer

Dizziness when standing up is often a caused by a drop in blood pressure, indicating a high risk of heart failure, according to WebMD. Orthostatic hypotension, a condition wherein blood pressure reduces by 10 or more points when the body moves from a reclining to a standing position, can cause a head rush or a brief fainting spell. The risk of developing heart failure is approximately 50 percent higher in those diagnosed with orthostatic hypotension.

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Full Answer

People suffering from orthostatic hypotension are more likely to have high blood pressure, which is also known to contribute to heart failure, explains WebMD. Heart failure occurs when the heart can no longer pump blood effectively to the rest of the body. The condition is treated with medication and lifestyle changes when it is diagnosed early. Occasional dizziness when standing isn't necessarily a cause for alarm; however, a person should consult a doctor if he experiences frequent episodes.

Experts indicate that a drop in blood pressure does not cause or explain heart failure, and studies only show a correlation, states WebMD. A likely theory is that hardened arteries, or atherosclerosis, may be the underlying cause. Hardened arteries don't contract properly in order to raise blood pressure and pump blood effectively. Other risk factors for heart disease include diabetes, family history and high cholesterol.

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