Q:

Is passing a kidney stone more painful for men than it is for women?

A:

Quick Answer

While there appears to be no differentiation in kidney stone pain between men and women, kidney stones are more common in men. Kidney stones are most prevalent among non-Hispanic white people and overweight people, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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Full Answer

In both men and women, kidney stones result in pain while urinating, sharp pain in the lower back and blood in the urine. The pain may be long or short in duration. Many people experience nausea and vomiting in addition to the pain. It is possible to pass a very small stone through the urinary tract with no symptoms at all, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

White men, starting in their 40s, have a greater risk for kidney stones than other groups. A family history of kidney stones also increases risk, according to WebMD. Risk for women increases in their 50s. In the United States, 1 in 11 people has a kidney stone.

Kidney stones form in the kidney when substances that are normally found in the urine, such as calcium, oxalate and phosphorus, become highly concentrated. People who do not drink enough fluids are at greater risk because their urine is concentrated, states The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

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