Q:

How much asparagus do you need to eat to cure cancer?

A:

Quick Answer

There is no evidence that eating asparagus can cure cancer, according to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Asparagus is an element of a healthy diet, not a cancer treatment.

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Full Answer

Asparagus is part of a cancer-protective diet, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research. Foods high in folate, like asparagus, lower the risk of colon, pancreatic and esophageal cancer. Asparagus is also high in the cancer-protective elements vitamin C and beta-carotene. A 1990 article in the International Journal of Epidemiology noted that people with lower levels of beta-carotene in their blood had higher frequencies of lung cancers.

Asparagus is one part of a healthy diet that contains fruits and vegetables, according to the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Instead of relying on asparagus alone, a healthy diet includes it as part of a plant-based diet. Asparagus contains phytonutrients that are shown to protect against cancer but not to cure cancer.

One of the health benefits of asparagus is its relatively high fiber level, notes the American Institute for Cancer Research. In a January 2013 article in the European Journal of Cancer Prevention, the Mediterranean diet was recommended as protective against cancer. The Mediterranean diet features plant-based foods and high fiber and antioxidant consumption through those vegetables. The diet is low in animal fats, such as those found in red meat, but allows for wine in moderation.

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