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How does the mortality rate of dementia compare to Alzheimer's?

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Quick Answer

Dementia accounts for more deaths than Alzheimer's because Alzheimer's is a type of dementia, according to Mayo Clinic. Other types of dementia include vascular dementia, lewy body dementia and frontotemporal dementia. Some conditions associated with dementia are Huntington's disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, Parkinson's disease and traumatic brain injury.

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How does the mortality rate of dementia compare to Alzheimer's?
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Full Answer

Alzheimer's is responsible for the deaths of more than 500,000 senior citizens annually, as of 2015, according to the Alzheimer's Association. In the United States, Alzheimer's is the fifth leading cause of death for people over the age of 65, and the sixth leading cause of death overall. Alzheimer's may have a higher mortality rate than is recorded.

Among the top 10 causes of disease-related deaths, Alzheimer's is the only one that can't be stopped, prevented or slowed, states the Alzheimer's Association. In the United States, Alzheimer's causes more deaths than breast cancer and prostate cancer combined, as of 2015. Between 2000 and 2010, deaths from Alzheimer's increased 68 percent.

Although most types of dementia have no treatment, a doctor may be able to provide medications or therapies that help a person to manage the symptoms, notes Mayo Clinic. Suggestions for caring for someone with Alzheimer's include speaking and communicating slowly and deliberately, encouraging exercise, playing games and thinking activities, and encouraging a healthy sleep schedule. Keeping a calendar may help to manage forgetfulness associated with dementia.

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