What Is Lecithin?

What Is Lecithin?

Lecithin is an essential fat in the body's cells and is present in many foods, such as egg yolks and soybeans, states WebMD. Doctors recommend it to treat memory disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Lecithin also treats gallbladder and liver diseases, anxiety, depression and high cholesterol.

Taking lecithin appears to have beneficial effects on liver disease, as it decreases fat accumulation in the livers of patients who receive long-term intravenous feeding. Some people use lecithin as a skin moisturizer and to treat eczema, according to WebMD. Manufacturers add lecithin to foods to prevent certain ingredients from separating. Some eye medicines contain lecithin to maintain contact between the eye’s cornea and the medicine. Lecithin converts into acetylcholine, a substance that sends nerve impulses.