Q:

What is a hyperechoic lesion in the liver?

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A hyperechoic liver lesion is a region on that liver that shows up on an ultrasound. This can be the result of a number of different conditions, some benign and some malignant.

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Among the most common cause of a hyperechoic liver lesion and one of the benign conditions is a hepatic hemangioma. This is the most common type of benign tumor of the liver and the most prevalent type of liver tumor overall. The causes of are thought to be congenital, meaning a patient is born with it. According to the Mayo Clinic, a hepatic hemangiona usually is asymptomatic and does not require any treatment. However, if the tumor grows large enough and causes obstruction with other organs in the abdomen, treatment options include surgery to remove the tumor and procedures to stop blood flow to the tumor so it shrinks.

Other benign conditions that may be the result of a hyperechoic liver lesion include a hepatic adenoma, focal fatty change, and an inflammatory pseudotumor of the liver, according to Radiopaedia.org. Malignant conditions that may result in a hyperechoic liver lesion include hepatic metastases and hepatocellular carcinoma, the latter common in livers that have been diagnosed with cirrhosis. Both of these conditions are serious and require immediate treatment and intervention, according to the National Cancer Institute.

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