Q:

Which herbal supplements are used to minimize the symptoms of PCOS?

A:

Quick Answer

Some herbal supplements commonly used to treat the symptoms of PCOS are berberine, chromium, flaxseed oil, inositol, L-arginine and maitake mushroom, according to WebMD, although it notes there is insufficient evidence to prove they work. Naturopath Dr. Pamela Frank suggests using N-acetylcysteine, alpha lipoic acid, myo-inositol and black cohosh to treat PCOS, or polycystic ovarian syndrome.

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Full Answer

Natural Fertility Info recommends essential fatty acid supplements such as fish oil, evening primrose oil, licorice root, maca, chaste tree berry, tribulus, white peony, gymnema and saw palmetto as well as bee pollen and propolis to treat the symptoms of PCOS.

Green tea and spearmint tea have been shown to have some effect in treating the symptoms of PCOS, as cited on PubMed, as have the vitamins B12 and folate.

Dr. Frank adds that weight loss; acupuncture and electroacupuncture; diet, including balancing protein and carbohydrates, a high-calorie breakfast, a low-calorie dinner and eating phytoestrogens found in soy; genistein; cinnamon; calcium and vitamin D can all help the symptoms of PCOS.

PCOS presents with a variety of symptoms such as polycystic ovaries, irregular or absent periods, bleeding midcycle, balding, excessive body hair, acne, mood disorders, obesity and recurrent miscarriages, as described by Natural Fertility Info.

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