Q:

What is the general prognosis for spinal cancer?

A:

Quick Answer

There is no one-size-fits-all prognosis for spinal cancer because prognosis varies significantly depending on many factors, according to the Canadian Cancer Society. Prognosis is determined by considering an individual's medical history, type of cancer, chosen treatments and survival statistics from spinal cancer studies.

Continue Reading
What is the general prognosis for spinal cancer?
Credit: BSIP Universal Images Group Getty Images

Full Answer

Tumor grade is a prognostic factor because low-grade tumors have a better prognosis than high-grade tumors, according to the Canadian Cancer Society. Tumor type is also a significant prognostic factor. Five-year relative survival rates for spinal cancer vary significantly depending on tumor type, according to the American Cancer Society. For example, glioblastoma spinal tumors correspond to low five-year relative survival rates, ranging from 4 to 17 percent. Conversely, ependymoma spinal tumors correspond to higher 5-year relative survival rates, ranging from 85 to 91 percent.

Tumor size and location are also significant because they determine the ease of surgical removal, according to Moffitt Cancer Center. Smaller tumors that are more easily accessible indicate a better prognosis. Additionally, tumor spread suggests a less favorable prognosis. Age is also a prognostic factor. Statistics show a direct inverse relationship between age and prognosis because five-year relative survival rates are progressively lower with older age groups.

An individual's ability to carry out daily activities prior to treatment indicates a better prognosis, according to the Canadian Cancer Society. Severe lower-body weakness suggests a less favorable prognosis. Individuals with neurological issues have a higher probability of responding unfavorably to treatment. Since prognosis depends heavily on each individual medical case, consulting a doctor is necessary.

Learn more about Cancer

Related Questions

Explore