STIs

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A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.

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  • Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

    Q: Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

    A: According to the New York University Langone Medical Center, it is highly unlikely to contract trichomoniasis from sitting on a toilet seat. Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease that is transmitted by sexual contact between two people.
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  • Why does it sting when I urinate?

    Q: Why does it sting when I urinate?

    A: MedicineNet explains that painful urination, often called dysuria, can be caused from both infectious and noninfectious conditions. However, the most common cause of painful urination is a bacterial infection of the bladder. More rarely, dysuria is caused by kidney stones, sexually transmitted diseases, prostatitis and interstitial cystitis.
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  • How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    Q: How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    A: A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.
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  • What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

    Q: What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

    A: According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, the name of the pathogen that leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The two are not entirely distinct illnesses, with AIDS indicating the late stages of infection with HIV.
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  • How long is mono contagious by kissing?

    Q: How long is mono contagious by kissing?

    A: According to The Nemours Foundation, people infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that causes mononucleosis can spread the virus for up to 18 months after symptoms disappear. The exact period of time is not known, but the virus eventually becomes dormant, causing neither symptoms nor contagion.
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  • Q: How long does it take to get STD test results back?

    A: To get results back for an STD test that requires laboratory testing usually takes about a week, according to Rutgers Medical Services. Not all tests for STDs require laboratory testing, however, and with some tests, such as rapid-testing for HIV, results are available almost immediately.
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  • Q: What are some of the subtle symptoms of herpes in women?

    A: Subtle symptoms of a first herpes outbreak include body aches, fever and swollen lymph nodes, states MedicineNet. Before a herpes outbreak, patients may feel a tingling, itchy or burning sensation on the skin. Most women with genital herpes develop painful blistering lesions around the vaginal opening and on the vulva.
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  • Q: What is the medical definition of chronic hepatitis?

    A: The medical definition of chronic hepatitis is liver inflammation that is present for at least 6 months in a patient, as noted by Merck Manual. In some patients, the condition can be mild and present no symptoms, while in others it can lead to symptoms, such as loss of appetite, overall body weakness or fatigue. However, when there is extensive damage to liver cells, it can lead cirrhosis or liver failure.
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  • Q: How long does it take for an STD to appear?

    A: The time it takes for a sexually transmitted disease, or STD, to appear depends on the type of STD a person has contracted. The different types of STDs include chlamydia, genital warts, genital herpes, syphilis, gonorrhea, HIV, pubic lice and scabies.
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  • Q: Where did the trichomoniasis parasite originate?

    A: The Trichomonas vaginalis parasite exists all over the world, according to BioMed Central. It is a pear-shaped or amoeba-like organism about 10 to 20 nanometers long and 2 to 14 nanometers wide. It has five flagella, or whip-like extensions, and a tail-like axostyle to help it move.
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  • Q: How long does it take for an STD to show up?

    A: An STD can show up anywhere from a few days to several weeks after exposure. Some STDs present no symptoms, making them harder to detect, states Mayo Clinic.
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  • Q: What are the causes of gonorrhea?

    A: The bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes gonorrhea, states Healthline. This bacterium tends to infect moist and warm parts of the body, such as the vagina, anus, eyes and female reproductive tract. This infection spreads from person to person through unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sex and commonly affects people who do not use a condom during sexual intercourse or people with many sexual partners.
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  • Q: When someone donates blood, are they tested for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)?

    A: Someone who donates blood is not directly tested for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) during the donation process, but the blood is screened for some diseases that are sexually transmitted, WebMD states. In addition, screening questions look into the donor's sexual history.
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  • Q: How do you protect yourself from a trichomonas transmission?

    A: To avoid trichomonas transmission, practice safer sex by using condoms. Men and women are both vulnerable to getting and transmitting the disease, but it is more common in women, states WebMD.
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  • Q: What is high risk HPV?

    A: High-risk HPV is a strain of HPV that causes abnormal cell changes and can lead to genital cancers. According to WebMD, two strains of high-risk HPV, types 16 and 18, cause 70 percent of all cervical cancers.
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  • Q: What are some warning signs of common sexually transmitted diseases?

    A: People who have common sexually transmitted diseases may not have any apparent symptoms right away, warns Mayo Clinic. Symptoms that do develop for chlamydia include lower abdominal pain, painful urination, bleeding between periods, discharge from the penis or vagina and testicular pain in men. Gonorrhea, a common sexually transmitted disease, causes pain or burning sensations when urinating, painful bowel movements, anal itching, and thick, bloody or cloudy discharge from the vagina or penis.
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  • Q: What are some effective cold sore treatments for kids?

    A: Some effective cold sore treatments for kids includes baby Orajel and Anbesol. Parents can also place a cool wet cloth on the sore several times per day, as stated by WebMD.
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  • Q: Which STD is the most dangerous?

    A: HIV/AIDS is the most dangerous sexually transmitted disease, with syphilis a close second, according to About.com. Part of the danger comes from the fact that there is no cure for this disease, explains Mayo Clinic.
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  • Q: How can you get a test to check for hep C virus?

    A: Healthcare professionals administer blood tests to check for hepatitis C, explains WebMD. The first blood test to screen for hepatitis C involves drawing blood to check for the presence of hepatitis C antibodies, notes Heathline. If the results of this test indicate that the blood is antibody reactive to the hepatitis C virus, health professionals recommend another blood test to check for the hepatitis C virus ribonucleic acid.
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  • Q: What are STDs?

    A: An STD is a sexually transmitted disease such as HIV, chlamydia, genital herpes, genital warts, gonorrhea, hepatitis, syphilis and trichomoniasis. It is spread through sexual contact. WebMD cautions that an STD can be very severe, sometimes resulting in lifelong treatment; HIV in particular has no cure. STDs are usually caused by bacteria and viruses in blood, semen and vaginal secretions, but genital herpes and warts can spread through skin-to-skin contact.
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  • Q: Does HPV cause health problems in men?

    A: Human papillomavirus, or HPV, can increase the risk for anal and penile cancer in men, according to WebMd. Low-risk strains not linked to cancer can also cause genital warts.
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