STIs

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A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.

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  • Why does it sting when I urinate?

    Q: Why does it sting when I urinate?

    A: MedicineNet explains that painful urination, often called dysuria, can be caused from both infectious and noninfectious conditions. However, the most common cause of painful urination is a bacterial infection of the bladder. More rarely, dysuria is caused by kidney stones, sexually transmitted diseases, prostatitis and interstitial cystitis.
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  • Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

    Q: Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

    A: According to the New York University Langone Medical Center, it is highly unlikely to contract trichomoniasis from sitting on a toilet seat. Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease that is transmitted by sexual contact between two people.
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  • How long is mono contagious by kissing?

    Q: How long is mono contagious by kissing?

    A: According to The Nemours Foundation, people infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that causes mononucleosis can spread the virus for up to 18 months after symptoms disappear. The exact period of time is not known, but the virus eventually becomes dormant, causing neither symptoms nor contagion.
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  • What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

    Q: What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

    A: According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, the name of the pathogen that leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The two are not entirely distinct illnesses, with AIDS indicating the late stages of infection with HIV.
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  • How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    Q: How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    A: A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.
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  • Q: How long does it take to get STD test results back?

    A: To get results back for an STD test that requires laboratory testing usually takes about a week, according to Rutgers Medical Services. Not all tests for STDs require laboratory testing, however, and with some tests, such as rapid-testing for HIV, results are available almost immediately.
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  • How do you get chlamydia?

    Q: How do you get chlamydia?

    A: Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted disease, explains the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition to sexual activity, mothers with chlamydia can pass the disease to their infants during childbirth. Chlamydia can be successfully treated with medication before it causes complications.
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  • Q: What are the symptoms of trichomoniasis infection in men?

    A: Men who exhibit symptoms of trichomoniasis can experience penile discharge, irritation inside the penis and a burning sensation after urination or ejaculation, according to WebMD. Men are often asymptomatic and only become aware of their own infections when their partners require treatment.
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  • Q: What does an RPR-reactive syphilis test mean?

    A: The University of Rochester Medical Center states that an RPR-reactivesyphilis test means there are antibodies for syphilis in the blood. A diagnostic test for the disease is typically given after a reactive result. A negative or "nonreactive" test means that the patient does not have syphilis.
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  • What were some of the first reported cases of the HIV virus?

    Q: What were some of the first reported cases of the HIV virus?

    A: In June of 1981, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported five cases of a rare pneumonia, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, in gay men in Los Angeles, according to AIDS.gov. Other rare infections in combination with the pneumonia suggested that their immune systems were failing for unknown reasons.
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  • Q: How can you get gonorrhea?

    A: The Centers for Disease Control states that gonorrhea is contracted through vaginal, anal or oral sex with an infected person. A pregnant woman with gonorrhea may also pass the disease to her child during childbirth. According to WebMD, gonorrhea is caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a bacterium that thrives in warm, moist mucus membranes, such as the cervix, uterus, mouth, throat and anus.
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  • Q: What are some over the counter treatments for chlamydia?

    A: Treatment for chlamydia involves antibiotics, which require a prescription from a physician, according to WebMD. Commonly prescribed antibiotics include azithromycin, doxycycline, erythromycin, amoxicillin and levofloxacin. Azithromycin and doxycycline cure chlamydia in approximately 95 percent of cases. Treatment with antibiotics is necessary for patients with a positive chlamydia test, sex partners of people diagnosed with chlamydia and newborn infants of mothers with active chlamydia infections during childbirth.
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  • Q: Does HPV cause health problems in men?

    A: Human papillomavirus, or HPV, can increase the risk for anal and penile cancer in men, according to WebMd. Low-risk strains not linked to cancer can also cause genital warts.
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  • Q: Where did STDs originate?

    A: Sexually transmitted diseases, or STDs, have been around for centuries. Syphilis and gonorrhea have been documented since the medieval time period according to the Encyclopedia of Children and Childhood in History and Society. The Herpes-Cold Sores Support Network states that herpes has been documented since ancient Greece but most likely originated long before then. According to Avert, HIV may have transferred to humans sometime between 1884 and 1924.
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  • Q: What are some facts about sexually transmitted infections?

    A: Facts about sexually transmitted infections are that there are more than 30 different transmissible bacteria, viruses and parasites that cause infection, and they are one of the top five reasons adults seek health care, according to the World Health Organization. Other facts about sexually transmitted infections are that they are preventable, many are transmitted through ways other than sexual contact and more than 1 million people acquire a sexually transmitted infection every day.
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  • Q: What are the treatment options for chlamydia?

    A: Oral antibiotics are the usual prescribed treatment for chlamydia, according to WebMD. The infection usually goes away within a week after starting the treatment. If the infection is severe, more aggressive treatments may be necessary.
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  • Q: What STDs does metronidazole treat?

    A: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the oral antibiotic metronidazole is an effective cure for trichomoniasis, the most common curable sexually transmitted disease. Bacterial vaginosis, caused by an imbalance of vaginal bacteria, is also treated with metronidazole, according to SmarterSex.org.
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  • Q: What are some effective cold sore treatments for kids?

    A: Some effective cold sore treatments for kids includes baby Orajel and Anbesol. Parents can also place a cool wet cloth on the sore several times per day, as stated by WebMD.
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  • Q: What are arguments for why hookup apps should be blamed for the rise in STDs?

    A: The main argument for blaming hookup apps for the rise in sexually transmitted diseases is that they allow people to change partners more quickly. Doctors say that the quicker an individual is able to change sexual partners, the higher the probability of contracting an STD, says the BBC.
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  • Q: What are the signs of syphilis in women?

    A: Early signs of syphilis in women include one or more small, painless ulcer-like sores on the genitals or around the mouth, according to WebMD. The sores appear anywhere between 10 and 90 days after exposure, most commonly around 21 days.
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  • Q: What are the causes of trichomoniasis?

    A: A unicellular protozoan parasite causes trichomoniasis, and it is generally transmitted during unprotected sexual contact, explains Mayo Clinic. Risk factors for the condition include having multiple sexual partners, a previous trichomoniasis infection or a history of other sexually transmitted infections.
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