STIs

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A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.

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  • Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

    Q: Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

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    According to the New York University Langone Medical Center, it is highly unlikely to contract trichomoniasis from sitting on a toilet seat. Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease that is transmitted by sexual contact between two people.

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  • How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    Q: How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

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    A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.

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  • What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

    Q: What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

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    According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, the name of the pathogen that leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The two are not entirely distinct illnesses, with AIDS indicating the late stages of infection with HIV.

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  • How long is mono contagious by kissing?

    Q: How long is mono contagious by kissing?

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    According to The Nemours Foundation, people infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that causes mononucleosis can spread the virus for up to 18 months after symptoms disappear. The exact period of time is not known, but the virus eventually becomes dormant, causing neither symptoms nor contagion.

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  • Why does it sting when I urinate?

    Q: Why does it sting when I urinate?

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    MedicineNet explains that painful urination, often called dysuria, can be caused from both infectious and noninfectious conditions. However, the most common cause of painful urination is a bacterial infection of the bladder. More rarely, dysuria is caused by kidney stones, sexually transmitted diseases, prostatitis and interstitial cystitis.

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  • Q: Is HPV contagious?

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    According to WebMD, human papillomavirus is contagious. There are approximately 100 different kinds of HPV, with about 40 types being sexually transmitted and about 60 types producing warts on the hands or feet.

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  • Q: How do you test for STDs?

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    Physical exams; blood samples; urine samples; or samples of saliva, cells, tissue or discharge are all types of tests for STDs. The method of testing for a particular STD depends on the symptoms the patient experiences and the type of infection suspected, according to Planned Parenthood.

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  • Q: Why are men circumcised?

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    Men are circumcised for reasons including religion, tradition, hygiene, health care and medical necessity, according to Mayo Clinic. Men also get circumcised to decrease their chances of getting some sexually transmitted diseases.

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  • Q: What should I make of IGM positive result?

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    An IGM positive result implies that a person may have been infected with dengue virus within recent weeks. The test may be requested if a person has symptoms that are linked to dengue following her or his travel to tropical areas where the virus is common. Such symptoms include easy bruising, bleeding, bone pain, headache and high fever.

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  • Q: Where can you get tested for STDs?

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    Many doctor's offices, most health departments and some clinics offer testing for sexually transmitted diseases, or STDs. It is important for a person who suspects he has an STD to get tested as soon as possible. The CDC estimates that 19 million new cases of STDs are diagnosed annually.

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  • Q: What does chlamydia look like?

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    People often fail to notice any signs or symptoms of chlamydia, but possible indications of infection are painful urination, penile or vaginal discharge, lower abdominal pain, testicular pain in men, and pain during intercourse in women, states Healthline. If the anus is affected, symptoms of pain, discharge and bleeding may occur from that area. Sore throat, cough or fever may indicate a chlamydia infection in the throat.

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  • Q: Can you get chlamydia from kissing?

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    Chlamydia does not spread from ordinary kissing, explains the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chlamydia spreads by vaginal, oral or anal sex with a partner already infected with chlamydia.

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  • What does a herpes skin rash look like?

    Q: What does a herpes skin rash look like?

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    The skin rash caused by either oral or genital herpes can present as red bumps that can turn into painful and itchy sores or blisters that may contain fluid, which later burst and crust over, relates the American Academy of Dermatology. The two forms of herpes virus that can cause these infections are herpes simplex virus 1 or herpes simplex virus 2. Oral herpes is caused by HSV-1, and genital herpes is caused generally by HSV-2, explains the American Skin Association.

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  • Q: What medicines should you take for HIV?

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    A list of FDA-approved medicines for HIV is published on the AIDSinfo website maintained by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Treatment based on these medicines is called antiretroviral therapy. It improves a patient’s quality of life but does not remove the HIV infection, HHS explains.

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  • Q: What is the cause of gonorrhea?

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    The bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes gonorrhea, and it is most often passed from person to person through oral, anal or vaginal intercourse, notes Mayo Clinic. People who are younger, those who have new or multiple sex partners, a previous diagnosis of gonorrhea, or who have other sexually transmitted infections are at higher risk of contracting gonorrhea.

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  • Q: How do you contract herpes?

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    People develop HSV-1, or herpes simplex type 1, most frequently as a child via skin contact with an adult carrying the virus, notes the American Academy of Dermatology. They develop HSV-2, or type 2, through sexual contact. In the United States, one in five sexually active adults is a carrier of HSV-2.

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  • Q: Where can you receive treatment for hepatitis B and C?

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    Hepatitis B or C treatment requires testing and medications, which only a licensed medical doctor can provide. The sooner treatment begins, the better the outcome, according to WebMD.

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  • Q: What are signs of HIV?

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    The signs and symptoms of human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, occur in three distinct stages and include aching muscles, fatigue and a red rash on the torso in the first stage, according to WebMD. The second stage can include an absence of symptoms for up to 10 years, while the third stage causes symptoms and signs such as unexplained weight loss, swollen lymph nodes and purple-colored spots on the skin.

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  • Q: How long does HPV last?

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    HPV, also known as human papillomavirus, is a permanent condition that lasts a lifetime for individuals affected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although a cure does not yet exist for HPV as of 2014, there are methods available to treat health problems associated with HPV.

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  • What is barrier nursing?

    Q: What is barrier nursing?

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    Barrier nursing is a method for administering patient care while preventing the transmission of highly contagious diseases. This is done for two reasons: a patient can be isolated to prevent the spread of disease to others, or isolation is imposed to protect a patient with a compromised immune system.

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  • Q: How long can HIV survive in a needle?

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    HIV can survive in a used needle for up to six weeks, according to NAM Aidsmap. When a discarded needle is reused, blood in the vacuum-sealed barrel of the needle can have live HIV in it and cause infection, according to AIDS Vancouver Island.

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