STIs

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A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.

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  • What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

    Q: What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

    A: According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, the name of the pathogen that leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The two are not entirely distinct illnesses, with AIDS indicating the late stages of infection with HIV.
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  • How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    Q: How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    A: A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.
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  • Why does it sting when I urinate?

    Q: Why does it sting when I urinate?

    A: MedicineNet explains that painful urination, often called dysuria, can be caused from both infectious and noninfectious conditions. However, the most common cause of painful urination is a bacterial infection of the bladder. More rarely, dysuria is caused by kidney stones, sexually transmitted diseases, prostatitis and interstitial cystitis.
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  • How long is mono contagious by kissing?

    Q: How long is mono contagious by kissing?

    A: According to The Nemours Foundation, people infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that causes mononucleosis can spread the virus for up to 18 months after symptoms disappear. The exact period of time is not known, but the virus eventually becomes dormant, causing neither symptoms nor contagion.
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  • Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

    Q: Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

    A: According to the New York University Langone Medical Center, it is highly unlikely to contract trichomoniasis from sitting on a toilet seat. Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease that is transmitted by sexual contact between two people.
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  • Q: How are lesions from HIV treated?

    A: Treatment for lesions caused by the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, varies based on the lesion type, location and size, according to the University of California, San Francisco. Examples of HIV-related lesions include fungal, viral, bacterial and neoplastic lesions.
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  • What are the symptoms of Epstein Barr syndrome?

    Q: What are the symptoms of Epstein Barr syndrome?

    A: Typical symptoms of Epstein-Barr infections, commonly known as mononucleosis, include swollen neck glands, muscle aches, fever, sore throat and rash, according to WebMD. Inappetence and fatigue are often present. The spleen and liver may be enlarged, and the tonsils may have pale discolorations.
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  • Q: How long can HIV survive in a needle?

    A: HIV can survive in a used needle for up to six weeks, according to NAM Aidsmap. When a discarded needle is reused, blood in the vacuum-sealed barrel of the needle can have live HIV in it and cause infection, according to AIDS Vancouver Island.
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  • Q: What are some tips for recognizing herpes blisters?

    A: Herpes blisters are painful and soon break open, ooze and form a crust, American Academy of Dermatology says. Itching, burning or tingling sensations often precede the emergence of herpes blisters by up to a day. The blisters first appear between two and 20 days after contact with an infected person and typically last between seven and 10 days. Swelling in nearby lymph nodes or flu-like symptoms may accompany an outbreak of herpes blisters.
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  • Q: Can HPV be cured?

    A: As of 2015, there is no cure for human papillomavirus; however, the infection often clears by itself, according to WebMD. When treatment is necessary patients have many options, most of which focus on the infection symptoms. HPV infections are very common in the United States, affecting approximately 20 million people.
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  • Q: How is HPV transmitted?

    A: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, HPV, also referred to as the human papillomavirus, is spread through sexual intercourse or oral sex with an infected individual. The most common routes of transmission are anal and vaginal intercourse. HPV symptoms can develop years after infection, so it is not always easy for individuals to determine if they are infected.
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  • Q: What are some common signs and symptoms of gonorrhea?

    A: Common symptoms of gonorrhea in men include a white or yellow penis discharge, a burning feeling while urinating and painful testicles, reports the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although most women have no symptoms or may mistake mild symptoms for vaginal or bladder infections, occasionally they may have a vaginal discharge, pain when urinating or vaginal bleeding outside their typical menstrual schedules. Signs of rectal gonorrhea infections may include itching, soreness, bleeding, discharge and painful defecation.
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  • Q: How long does it take for symptoms of HIV disease to appear?

    A: Symptoms of HIV generally appear within two to four weeks, according to AIDS.gov. The acute infection period is the first stage of HIV and often causes symptoms similar to the flu.
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  • Q: What is the cause of gonorrhea?

    A: The bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes gonorrhea, and it is most often passed from person to person through oral, anal or vaginal intercourse, notes Mayo Clinic. People who are younger, those who have new or multiple sex partners, a previous diagnosis of gonorrhea, or who have other sexually transmitted infections are at higher risk of contracting gonorrhea.
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  • Q: What do symptoms of HPV look like?

    A: Genital, common, plantar or flat warts are the most common visible symptoms of HPV, according to Mayo Clinic. HPV has more than 100 variations in symptoms that range from no symptoms to cancer.
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  • Q: Can you get an STD from saliva?

    A: Herpes is a sexually transmitted disease spread through saliva. According to WebMD, Hepatitis B can be transmitted by sharing a toothbrush with someone who has it.
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  • Q: How can you get gonorrhea?

    A: The Centers for Disease Control states that gonorrhea is contracted through vaginal, anal or oral sex with an infected person. A pregnant woman with gonorrhea may also pass the disease to her child during childbirth. According to WebMD, gonorrhea is caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a bacterium that thrives in warm, moist mucus membranes, such as the cervix, uterus, mouth, throat and anus.
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  • Q: Why are men circumcised?

    A: Men are circumcised for reasons including religion, tradition, hygiene, health care and medical necessity, according to Mayo Clinic. Men also get circumcised to decrease their chances of getting some sexually transmitted diseases.
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  • Q: What are signs of HIV?

    A: The signs and symptoms of human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, occur in three distinct stages and include aching muscles, fatigue and a red rash on the torso in the first stage, according to WebMD. The second stage can include an absence of symptoms for up to 10 years, while the third stage causes symptoms and signs such as unexplained weight loss, swollen lymph nodes and purple-colored spots on the skin.
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  • Q: Where can you get tested for STDs?

    A: Many doctor's offices, most health departments and some clinics offer testing for sexually transmitted diseases, or STDs. It is important for a person who suspects he has an STD to get tested as soon as possible. The CDC estimates that 19 million new cases of STDs are diagnosed annually.
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  • Q: What is the treatment for genital warts?

    A: In genital warts cases in which the human papillomavirus causes abnormal cell changes, the cells may be frozen with liquid nitrogen, a cone biopsy may be performed to remove the cells, or the cells may be removed with an electrical current, reports WebMD. Often no treatment is required and cells heal on their own.
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