STIs

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A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.

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  • Why does it sting when I urinate?

    Q: Why does it sting when I urinate?

    A: MedicineNet explains that painful urination, often called dysuria, can be caused from both infectious and noninfectious conditions. However, the most common cause of painful urination is a bacterial infection of the bladder. More rarely, dysuria is caused by kidney stones, sexually transmitted diseases, prostatitis and interstitial cystitis.
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  • Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

    Q: Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

    A: According to the New York University Langone Medical Center, it is highly unlikely to contract trichomoniasis from sitting on a toilet seat. Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease that is transmitted by sexual contact between two people.
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  • How long is mono contagious by kissing?

    Q: How long is mono contagious by kissing?

    A: According to The Nemours Foundation, people infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that causes mononucleosis can spread the virus for up to 18 months after symptoms disappear. The exact period of time is not known, but the virus eventually becomes dormant, causing neither symptoms nor contagion.
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  • What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

    Q: What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

    A: According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, the name of the pathogen that leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The two are not entirely distinct illnesses, with AIDS indicating the late stages of infection with HIV.
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  • How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    Q: How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    A: A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.
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  • Q: Is syphilis curable?

    A: According to the Centers for Disease Control, syphilis can be treated and cured using antibiotics. Fast treatment is recommended to prevent the spread of this disease to others and to prevent complications that syphilis can cause.
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  • Q: Is there a cure for gonorrhea?

    A: Antibiotics can cure gonorrhea, although some strains of gonorrhea are resistant to certain antibiotics as of 2015, according to WebMD. If symptoms of gonorrhea do not improve with treatment, a doctor does a gonorrhea culture to determine if there is bacterial resistance to the antibiotic being taken.
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  • Q: What are some facts about sexually transmitted infections?

    A: Facts about sexually transmitted infections are that there are more than 30 different transmissible bacteria, viruses and parasites that cause infection, and they are one of the top five reasons adults seek health care, according to the World Health Organization. Other facts about sexually transmitted infections are that they are preventable, many are transmitted through ways other than sexual contact and more than 1 million people acquire a sexually transmitted infection every day.
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  • Q: What is balanitis?

    A: Balanitis is an inflammation of the foreskin or head of the penis, states Healthline. The swelling commonly occurs in uncircumcised men, often due to poor hygiene and the overpopulation of opportunistic bacteria. Although often painful, in most cases balanitis is not serious and can often be remedied with topical medication.
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  • Q: What's the difference between hepatitis B and C?

    A: Hepatitis B is a liver condition caused by the hepatitis B virus, while hepatitis C occurs when hepatitis C virus attacks the liver, causing inflammation, says Mayo Clinic. Hepatitis C spread through coming into contact with infected blood, such as sharing infected needles to inject drugs. Hepatitis B mainly spread through sexual contact and birth to a mother with the hepatitis B virus, according to Healthline.
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  • What does a herpes skin rash look like?

    Q: What does a herpes skin rash look like?

    A: The skin rash caused by either oral or genital herpes can present as red bumps that can turn into painful and itchy sores or blisters that may contain fluid, which later burst and crust over, relates the American Academy of Dermatology. The two forms of herpes virus that can cause these infections are herpes simplex virus 1 or herpes simplex virus 2. Oral herpes is caused by HSV-1, and genital herpes is caused generally by HSV-2, explains the American Skin Association.
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  • Q: What causes HPV?

    A: Human papillomavirus is caused by having oral, anal or vaginal sex with an infected person, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HPV is the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection in the United States as of October 2014 and is so common that nearly everyone who is sexually active will get HPV at some point.
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  • Q: What are the symptoms of high risk HPV?

    A: High-risk human papillomavirus lacks noticeable symptoms, states Planned Parenthood. Despite the abnormal cell changes it causes, most infected people feel normal. Women ascertain human papillomavirus infection through a pap test. Pap tests recognize the presence of abnormal cells as a result of infection by high-risk human papillomavirus.
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  • Q: When was trichomoniasis first diagnosed?

    A: It is unclear when the first case of trichomoniasis was reported, though the infection is caused by the protozoa trichomonas vaginalis, first discovered in the 1830s, reports the Journal of Clinical Cytology and Cytopathology. Up to 20 percent of women develop trichomoniasis at some point, states Everyday Health.
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  • Q: What state has the highest STD rate?

    A: Based on 2012 data by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, there is no single state with the highest sexually transmitted disease rate, but states that recorded high rates include Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. The most common STDs in these states were syphilis, chlamydia and gonorrhea.
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  • Q: What is a treatment for molluscum?

    A: Most cases of molluscum contagiosum do not require treatment, according to WebMD. Instead, the bumps clear up by themselves within six to nine months. Some bumps may take years to clear, and doctors may also prescribe treatments for those that appear in the genital area.
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  • Q: What are arguments for why hookup apps should be blamed for the rise in STDs?

    A: The main argument for blaming hookup apps for the rise in sexually transmitted diseases is that they allow people to change partners more quickly. Doctors say that the quicker an individual is able to change sexual partners, the higher the probability of contracting an STD, says the BBC.
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  • Q: What are the causes of gonorrhea?

    A: The bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes gonorrhea, states Healthline. This bacterium tends to infect moist and warm parts of the body, such as the vagina, anus, eyes and female reproductive tract. This infection spreads from person to person through unprotected vaginal, anal or oral sex and commonly affects people who do not use a condom during sexual intercourse or people with many sexual partners.
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  • Q: How long does it take for an STD to appear?

    A: The time it takes for a sexually transmitted disease, or STD, to appear depends on the type of STD a person has contracted. The different types of STDs include chlamydia, genital warts, genital herpes, syphilis, gonorrhea, HIV, pubic lice and scabies.
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  • Q: Where can you find photos of scabies on skin?

    A: Photos of scabies on skin are available online at the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) and Hardin MD of the University of Iowa. A slideshow that includes relevant information and features images of dermal scabies is also presented online at WebMD.
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  • Q: What is high risk HPV?

    A: High-risk HPV is a strain of HPV that causes abnormal cell changes and can lead to genital cancers. According to WebMD, two strains of high-risk HPV, types 16 and 18, cause 70 percent of all cervical cancers.
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