STIs

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A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.

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  • How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    Q: How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    A: A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.
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  • How long is mono contagious by kissing?

    Q: How long is mono contagious by kissing?

    A: According to The Nemours Foundation, people infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that causes mononucleosis can spread the virus for up to 18 months after symptoms disappear. The exact period of time is not known, but the virus eventually becomes dormant, causing neither symptoms nor contagion.
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  • Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

    Q: Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

    A: According to the New York University Langone Medical Center, it is highly unlikely to contract trichomoniasis from sitting on a toilet seat. Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease that is transmitted by sexual contact between two people.
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  • What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

    Q: What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

    A: According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, the name of the pathogen that leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The two are not entirely distinct illnesses, with AIDS indicating the late stages of infection with HIV.
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  • Why does it sting when I urinate?

    Q: Why does it sting when I urinate?

    A: MedicineNet explains that painful urination, often called dysuria, can be caused from both infectious and noninfectious conditions. However, the most common cause of painful urination is a bacterial infection of the bladder. More rarely, dysuria is caused by kidney stones, sexually transmitted diseases, prostatitis and interstitial cystitis.
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  • Q: What are STDs?

    A: An STD is a sexually transmitted disease such as HIV, chlamydia, genital herpes, genital warts, gonorrhea, hepatitis, syphilis and trichomoniasis. It is spread through sexual contact. WebMD cautions that an STD can be very severe, sometimes resulting in lifelong treatment; HIV in particular has no cure. STDs are usually caused by bacteria and viruses in blood, semen and vaginal secretions, but genital herpes and warts can spread through skin-to-skin contact.
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  • Q: What is the role of stabilized liquid oxygen in herpes treatments?

    A: As of 2015, no credible medical evidence is available to indicate stabilized liquid oxygen facilitates herpes treatment. Physicians treat herpes using anti-viral medications such as acyclovir, famciclovir and valacyclovir, recommends Mayo Clinic.
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  • Q: What should I make of IGM positive result?

    A: An IGM positive result implies that a person may have been infected with dengue virus within recent weeks. The test may be requested if a person has symptoms that are linked to dengue following her or his travel to tropical areas where the virus is common. Such symptoms include easy bruising, bleeding, bone pain, headache and high fever.
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  • Q: What does an RPR-reactive syphilis test mean?

    A: The University of Rochester Medical Center states that an RPR-reactivesyphilis test means there are antibodies for syphilis in the blood. A diagnostic test for the disease is typically given after a reactive result. A negative or "nonreactive" test means that the patient does not have syphilis.
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  • What is a treatment for chlamydia?

    Q: What is a treatment for chlamydia?

    A: Chlamydia, a sexually transmitted bacterial infection, is typically treated using the oral antibiotics doxycycline and azithromycin, which is more commonly known by the brand name Zithromax, according to WebMD. In more serious cases of chlamydia, hospitalization and treatment with intravenous antibiotic medications may be required.
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  • Q: What are the types of treatment for genital warts?

    A: Doctors treat external genital warts with medications, freezing and surgical removal, states the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Patients who prefer to treat themselves at home apply ointments or gels, while health professionals treat patients with cryotherapy, acid or resin application, or one of four types of surgical excision.
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  • Q: What are some facts about sexually transmitted infections?

    A: Facts about sexually transmitted infections are that there are more than 30 different transmissible bacteria, viruses and parasites that cause infection, and they are one of the top five reasons adults seek health care, according to the World Health Organization. Other facts about sexually transmitted infections are that they are preventable, many are transmitted through ways other than sexual contact and more than 1 million people acquire a sexually transmitted infection every day.
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  • Q: What is the treatment for genital warts?

    A: In genital warts cases in which the human papillomavirus causes abnormal cell changes, the cells may be frozen with liquid nitrogen, a cone biopsy may be performed to remove the cells, or the cells may be removed with an electrical current, reports WebMD. Often no treatment is required and cells heal on their own.
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  • Q: What are the causes of trichomoniasis?

    A: A unicellular protozoan parasite causes trichomoniasis, and it is generally transmitted during unprotected sexual contact, explains Mayo Clinic. Risk factors for the condition include having multiple sexual partners, a previous trichomoniasis infection or a history of other sexually transmitted infections.
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  • Q: How long does HPV last?

    A: HPV, also known as human papillomavirus, is a permanent condition that lasts a lifetime for individuals affected, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although a cure does not yet exist for HPV as of 2014, there are methods available to treat health problems associated with HPV.
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  • Q: What medicines should you take for HIV?

    A: A list of FDA-approved medicines for HIV is published on the AIDSinfo website maintained by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Treatment based on these medicines is called antiretroviral therapy. It improves a patient’s quality of life but does not remove the HIV infection, HHS explains.
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  • What are the symptoms of Epstein Barr syndrome?

    Q: What are the symptoms of Epstein Barr syndrome?

    A: Typical symptoms of Epstein-Barr infections, commonly known as mononucleosis, include swollen neck glands, muscle aches, fever, sore throat and rash, according to WebMD. Inappetence and fatigue are often present. The spleen and liver may be enlarged, and the tonsils may have pale discolorations.
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  • Q: How are lesions from HIV treated?

    A: Treatment for lesions caused by the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV, varies based on the lesion type, location and size, according to the University of California, San Francisco. Examples of HIV-related lesions include fungal, viral, bacterial and neoplastic lesions.
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  • Q: What is a list of curable STDs?

    A: Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) caused by bacteria are curable. Some of the most common bacterial STDs include gonorrhea, syphilis and chlamydia. The general course of treatment for these STDs is antibiotics, according to the University of North Carolina, Greensboro.
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  • Q: Can you get rid of gonorrhea?

    A: Gonorrhea is treated using antibiotics, and at the end of a course of prescribed antibiotics, the bacteria causing gonorrhea is eradicated from the body and the patient is cured, according to WebMD. However, damage done to the body by the bacteria cannot be reversed, making early detection and treatment important, according to the U.S. Center for Disease Control.
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  • Q: Is Flagyl the only treatment option for trichomoniasis?

    A: Doctors usually treat trichomoniasis with a single dose of either metronidazole or tinidazole, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. These medications are oral antibiotics. Because unpleasant side effects may occur, individuals should avoid alcohol for 24 hours after taking these medications.
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