STIs

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A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.

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  • Why does it sting when I urinate?

    Q: Why does it sting when I urinate?

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    MedicineNet explains that painful urination, often called dysuria, can be caused from both infectious and noninfectious conditions. However, the most common cause of painful urination is a bacterial infection of the bladder. More rarely, dysuria is caused by kidney stones, sexually transmitted diseases, prostatitis and interstitial cystitis.

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  • Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

    Q: Can you get trichomoniasis from a toilet seat?

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    According to the New York University Langone Medical Center, it is highly unlikely to contract trichomoniasis from sitting on a toilet seat. Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted disease that is transmitted by sexual contact between two people.

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  • How long is mono contagious by kissing?

    Q: How long is mono contagious by kissing?

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    According to The Nemours Foundation, people infected with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) that causes mononucleosis can spread the virus for up to 18 months after symptoms disappear. The exact period of time is not known, but the virus eventually becomes dormant, causing neither symptoms nor contagion.

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  • How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    Q: How long does it take for chlamydia to clear up?

    A:

    A chlamydia infection typically clears up in seven to 10 days when treated with antibiotics, according to KidsHealth. An infected person doesn't always experience symptoms, which increases the risk of spreading this sexually transmitted disease to other partners. Untreated chlamydia can cause serious long-term complications, such as infertility, and pregnant mothers may transmit the disease to newborns.

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  • What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

    Q: What is the name of the pathogen that causes AIDS?

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    According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, the name of the pathogen that leads to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The two are not entirely distinct illnesses, with AIDS indicating the late stages of infection with HIV.

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  • Q: What is the medical definition of chronic hepatitis?

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    The medical definition of chronic hepatitis is liver inflammation that is present for at least 6 months in a patient, as noted by Merck Manual. In some patients, the condition can be mild and present no symptoms, while in others it can lead to symptoms, such as loss of appetite, overall body weakness or fatigue. However, when there is extensive damage to liver cells, it can lead cirrhosis or liver failure.

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  • Q: How can you get gonorrhea?

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    The Centers for Disease Control states that gonorrhea is contracted through vaginal, anal or oral sex with an infected person. A pregnant woman with gonorrhea may also pass the disease to her child during childbirth. According to WebMD, gonorrhea is caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a bacterium that thrives in warm, moist mucus membranes, such as the cervix, uterus, mouth, throat and anus.

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  • Q: How can you identify an HIV rash on the body?

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    Rashes caused by the HIV virus typically appear as a flattened and red area of skin, usually covered by small red bumps, according to Healthline. These rashes can appear anywhere on the body but are most common on the chest, face, feet and hands.

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  • Q: What is a treatment for molluscum?

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    Most cases of molluscum contagiosum do not require treatment, according to WebMD. Instead, the bumps clear up by themselves within six to nine months. Some bumps may take years to clear, and doctors may also prescribe treatments for those that appear in the genital area.

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  • Q: What does it mean when you get a little bump on your tongue?

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    According to WebMD, a small bump on the tongue is a common symptom of a canker sore. Canker sores are mouth ulcers that range in size and are often linked with stress. In many cases, bumps and sores of the tongue are no cause for concern, but it is important to consult with a health professional if the bump or sore persists longer than one week.

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  • Q: What is the best way to get rid of cold sores?

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    Getting rid of cold sores involves taking antiviral medications such as acyclovir, valacyclovir, famciclovir and penciclovir, according to Mayo Clinic. Fortunately, cold sores usually get better on their own after two to four weeks without treatment.

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  • What is a treatment for chlamydia?

    Q: What is a treatment for chlamydia?

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    Chlamydia, a sexually transmitted bacterial infection, is typically treated using the oral antibiotics doxycycline and azithromycin, which is more commonly known by the brand name Zithromax, according to WebMD. In more serious cases of chlamydia, hospitalization and treatment with intravenous antibiotic medications may be required.

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  • Q: How long does it take for symptoms of HIV disease to appear?

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    Symptoms of HIV generally appear within two to four weeks, according to AIDS.gov. The acute infection period is the first stage of HIV and often causes symptoms similar to the flu.

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  • Q: What are some facts about sexually transmitted infections?

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    Facts about sexually transmitted infections are that there are more than 30 different transmissible bacteria, viruses and parasites that cause infection, and they are one of the top five reasons adults seek health care, according to the World Health Organization. Other facts about sexually transmitted infections are that they are preventable, many are transmitted through ways other than sexual contact and more than 1 million people acquire a sexually transmitted infection every day.

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  • Q: What is balanitis?

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    Balanitis is an inflammation of the foreskin or head of the penis, states Healthline. The swelling commonly occurs in uncircumcised men, often due to poor hygiene and the overpopulation of opportunistic bacteria. Although often painful, in most cases balanitis is not serious and can often be remedied with topical medication.

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  • Q: Can HPV be spread non-sexually?

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    Human papillomavirus can be transmitted non-sexually. According to Health News, HPV can't be killed by disinfectants, so there is a risk of being infected by a medical instrument or tool that harbors the virus. Also, a pregnant woman is able to transmit the virus to her unborn baby.

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  • Q: How long can you live with herpes?

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    Since there is no cure for herpes, people with the diagnosis must learn to live with it for their lifetimes, WebMD reports. However, the site notes that there are coping strategies for dealing with the disease.

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  • Q: What does chlamydia look like?

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    People often fail to notice any signs or symptoms of chlamydia, but possible indications of infection are painful urination, penile or vaginal discharge, lower abdominal pain, testicular pain in men, and pain during intercourse in women, states Healthline. If the anus is affected, symptoms of pain, discharge and bleeding may occur from that area. Sore throat, cough or fever may indicate a chlamydia infection in the throat.

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  • Q: When someone donates blood, are they tested for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)?

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    Someone who donates blood is not directly tested for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) during the donation process, but the blood is screened for some diseases that are sexually transmitted, WebMD states. In addition, screening questions look into the donor's sexual history.

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  • Q: Does Super Lysine Plus work for cold sores?

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    Super Lysine Plus is an over-the-counter medication used to treat cold sores, according to WebMD. The drug works by reducing the replication rate of the virus that is responsible for the cold sores.

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  • Q: Is syphilis curable?

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    According to the Centers for Disease Control, syphilis can be treated and cured using antibiotics. Fast treatment is recommended to prevent the spread of this disease to others and to prevent complications that syphilis can cause.

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