Reproductive Anatomy

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According to American Pregnancy, ovulation itself lasts only one day while an egg is detached from the ovary follicle. However, the entire ovulation cycle is composed of two longer phases called the follicular and luteal phases.

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  • How many days does ovulation last?

    Q: How many days does ovulation last?

    A: According to American Pregnancy, ovulation itself lasts only one day while an egg is detached from the ovary follicle. However, the entire ovulation cycle is composed of two longer phases called the follicular and luteal phases.
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  • How much does a uterus weigh?

    Q: How much does a uterus weigh?

    A: According to ob-gyn Dr. Deborah Wilson, the size of the human uterus varies. However, she does stipulate that the organ generally weighs between 0.06 and 0.22 pounds. Dr. Wilson adds that the uteruses in women who have not given birth are generally smaller in size than in those who have.
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  • What happens to an unfertilized egg?

    Q: What happens to an unfertilized egg?

    A: A human egg that is not fertilized breaks apart and is expelled from the body during menstruation. According to Women's Health, hormone levels start to drop after the egg breaks apart, triggering the onset of menstruation.
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  • What is the difference between fecundity and fertility?

    Q: What is the difference between fecundity and fertility?

    A: Fertility is the natural capacity to produce offspring, whereas fecundity is the potential capacity for reproduction, according to Biology Online. Although the terms are often used interchangeably in common language, the Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and Research explains how they take on very distinct meanings when discussing matters of demographics and human population trends.
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  • How do humans mate?

    Q: How do humans mate?

    A: According to David M. Buss of the University of Texas at Austin, humans depend on several successful strategies for mating, which they inherited from their ancestors. These strategies include: long-term, short-term and extra-pair mating. However, each sex has different mating strategies including the type of mate preferred, the desire for short-term versus long-term mating and the ways in which jealousy results.
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  • How often do men produce sperm?

    Q: How often do men produce sperm?

    A: Men produce sperm on a continuous basis. An average man produces over one million sperm a day, according to MSN Health; however, this may vary in men with a sperm count that is considered low.
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  • What is a fetal pole?

    Q: What is a fetal pole?

    A: A fetal pole is a collection of fetal cells that can be detected via vaginal ultrasound around the sixth week of pregnancy. Separate from the yolk sac, it is considered the somite stage of the fetus.
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  • What is a heterogeneous uterus?

    Q: What is a heterogeneous uterus?

    A: A heterogeneous uterus is a term used to describe the appearance of the uterus after an ultrasound is conducted. It simply means that the uterus is not totally uniform in appearance during the ultrasound.
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  • Q: What are the possible long-term products after a hysterectomy?

    A: The possible long term effects of a hysterectomy are pelvic floor disorders, pelvic organ prolapse, urinary and anal incontinence, bowel dysfunction and constipation, according to a study conducted by Dr. Forsgen and Altman published in Aging Health. Some less-substantiated long term effects are cardiovascular disease, sexual dysfunction and cancer.
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  • Q: What causes ovarian cysts?

    A: The most common type of ovarian cyst, called a functional cyst, is formed during ovulation when either the egg isn't released or the follicle, or sac, doesn't dissolve after the egg is released. Cysts, or fluid-filled sacs that form in the ovaries, are very common in women of child-bearing age, according to WebMD. Other cysts develop from unopened follicles or from cells on the surface of the ovary.
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  • Q: How is a robotic hysterectomy performed?

    A: Arobotic hysterectomy is performed with instruments that are inserted throughsmaller incisions and manipulated by the surgeon to remove the uterus, notes Mayo Clinic. The 3-D image that a surgeon uses allows for a high level of precision, controland accuracy. The smaller incision allows for quicker healing time and fewer surgical risks.
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  • Q: Can women get jock itch?

    A: Jock itch is more common in men, but women can get it, as stated by WebMD. Jock itch causes symptoms such as itchy, red skin.
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  • Q: Why do you gain weight after a hysterectomy?

    A: Weight gain among women who have undergone hysterectomy surgery is thought to be caused by changes in hormone production, says Women's Health. Changes to lifestyle may also play a role, according to Healthy Women.
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  • Q: How does lochia smell?

    A: Lochia, the vaginal discharge following child birth, has a smell similar to that of a normal menstrual flow, according to HealthPages.org. It is a natural occurrence and normally not one for concern.
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  • What are some natural sources of sildenafil citrate?

    Q: What are some natural sources of sildenafil citrate?

    A: The Alternative Daily suggests herbs such as muira puama, ginkgo biloba and the maca root as natural alternatives to sildenafil citrate. Sildenafil citrate, commonly known as Viagra, is a man-made substance that stimulates the male sex drive. It can cause serious side effects if used long term.
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  • Q: What is a retroverted uterus?

    A: A retroverted uterus is a uterus where the top of the uterus is tipped towards the rectum rather than towards the abdominal wall, according to Better Health Channel. Other names for a retroverted uterus include retroflexed uterus, tipped uterus and uterine retrodisplacement.
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  • Q: What is endometrial thickening?

    A: Endometrial thickening, medically referred to as endometrial hyperplasia, occurs when a woman's uterine lining accumulates an abnormal mass of cells during her menstrual cycle, explains Healthgrades. This is most often caused by a hormonal imbalance accompanying menopause but can also occur as a result of polycystic ovarian syndrome or obesity.
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  • Q: What should you consider when undergoing ovarian dermoid cyst removal surgery?

    A: Some considerations regarding ovarian dermoid cyst removal include the reason for the procedure, surgical risks and the expected outcome, according to WebMD. A doctor may recommend surgery if the cyst is large, if cysts are present on both ovaries or if there are reasons to suspect cancer.
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  • Q: What is a medical doctor who specializes in female anatomy?

    A: Medical doctors who specializing in women's reproductive health are known as gynecologists or obstetrician-gynecologists; frequently abbreviated as "OB-GYNs." To become an OB-GYN, a doctor must complete a specialized four-year residency focused on women's primary and reproductive health care, according to the American College of Surgeons.
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  • Q: How do you find a polyp on the cervix?

    A: A cervical polyp is diagnosed through a physical examination and a biopsy, according to MedlinePlus. During the physical examination, if the doctor sees fingerlike smooth growths that are smooth and red or purple, a cervical biopsy is performed to determine if the polyp is cancerous. Most cervical polyps are benign.
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  • What is a "bulky uterus"?

    Q: What is a "bulky uterus"?

    A: According to the Mayo Clinic, a bulky uterus, scientifically known as "adenomyosis," occurs when the tissue that typically lines the uterus grows instead into the muscular wall of the uterus. Adenomyosis most often occurs after having children.
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