Insect & Animal Bites

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According to naturalist Debbie Hadley for About.com, ticks are most commonly found in warm areas where they are able to easily hide, such as within the hair, behind the knees, between the legs, under the arms and sometimes in the belly button. Ticks hide on the body to keep warm and go undetected so they are able to feed for longer periods of time without being noticed.

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  • Is There a Disease Caused by Bedbugs?

    Q: Is There a Disease Caused by Bedbugs?

    A: There is no evidence to prove that bedbug bites cause infections or disease themselves. It is suspected that they aid in the spread of infectious diseases, but this has not been proven. At worst a person scratching the bites makes himself more susceptible to infection by aggravating the wound sites and potentially introducing bacteria.
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  • Can I Get Rabies From a Rat Bite?

    Q: Can I Get Rabies From a Rat Bite?

    A: According to the Centers for Disease Control, there are no known cases of rats transmitting rabies to humans. In fact, other small rodents, as well as rabbits and hares, do not seem to pass the disease along, observes the CDC.
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  • How Can Scars From Bug Bites Be Lightened?

    Q: How Can Scars From Bug Bites Be Lightened?

    A: There are several ways to treat scars caused by bug bites, including the use of steroid injections, surgery, filler injections and laser resurfacing, according to WebMD. Most treatment options look at improving the look of the scar; no treatment can currently remove scars altogether.
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  • Where Do Ticks Commonly Hide on Your Body?

    Q: Where Do Ticks Commonly Hide on Your Body?

    A: According to naturalist Debbie Hadley for About.com, ticks are most commonly found in warm areas where they are able to easily hide, such as within the hair, behind the knees, between the legs, under the arms and sometimes in the belly button. Ticks hide on the body to keep warm and go undetected so they are able to feed for longer periods of time without being noticed.
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  • How Do People Get Lice?

    Q: How Do People Get Lice?

    A: According to the Center for Disease Control, head lice are spread by head-to-head contact with a person that is already infested. Such contact is common with children while they play at home, school or sporting events. Sharing clothing is another common method of spreading lice, especially hats, scarves, hair ribbons, barrettes, combs and brushes. Lice may also pass through the sharing of toys, such as stuffed animals.
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  • How Long Do Flea Bites Last?

    Q: How Long Do Flea Bites Last?

    A: According to FleaBites.net, bites from fleas typically require a few weeks to fully heal. The time it takes for flea bites to heal is heavily dependent on how sensitive a person is to them.
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  • Why Do Bug Bites Itch?

    Q: Why Do Bug Bites Itch?

    A: Bug bites itch because of a mild immune system reaction to bug saliva, according to the Mayo Clinic. When a bug bites someone it injects its saliva into the skin and the reaction in the body's immune system can result in an itchy bump.
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  • What Does an Ant Bite Look Like and How Do You Treat It?

    Q: What Does an Ant Bite Look Like and How Do You Treat It?

    A: Biting ants, or fire ants, leave red hive-like lesions that are distinct for their immense burning and itching, according to WebMD. In some cases, the lesions or blisters fill with puss and, in other cases, the bites create a life-threatening allergic reaction, according to WebMD. For the quickest relief, ice packs, pain relievers and antihistamines are commonly used to treat the pain and itching associated with ant bites, according to WebMD.
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  • How Long Does It Take for a Flea Bite to Go Away?

    Q: How Long Does It Take for a Flea Bite to Go Away?

    A: The healing time for a flea bite varies widely based on the use of topical treatments and an individual's reaction to the bites, according to The Travel Doctor. Being able to recognize and treat flea bites as well as eliminate the pests from indoor environments can go a long way to shortening healing time and preventing bites in the future.
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  • Can Flea Bites Make You Sick?

    Q: Can Flea Bites Make You Sick?

    A: Fleas can carry infectious diseases from animals, and their bites can transfer these diseases to humans. The Public Health Department of Seattle and King County states that a flea bite does not necessarily mean a person will get sick, but some of the diseases fleas transmit can be deadly.
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  • What Are the Symptoms of Spider Bites on Dogs?

    Q: What Are the Symptoms of Spider Bites on Dogs?

    A: Spider bumps cause large swollen bumps on the dog's skin. If the dog is bitten on the nose or mouth, it can have trouble breathing. Spider bites are extremely painful, and the dog can exhibit signs of pain. Although most spider bites do not penetrate the skin, black widow and brown recluse spider bites do, and they are extremely venomous, according to Pet Assure Newsletter.
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  • What Are Some Home Treatments for Bedbug Bites?

    Q: What Are Some Home Treatments for Bedbug Bites?

    A: Recommended home treatments for bedbug bites include washing the affected areas with soap and water and applying a corticosteroid cream for itchy bites, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. Bedbug bites often heal and disappear after one or two weeks.
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  • Q: How Does a Person Get Rid of Flea Bites?

    A: Flea bites go away on their own and normally do not require treatment, according to Healthline. Anti-itch creams available over the counter help to alleviate the itching. Oral antihistamines are helpful as well.
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  • Q: How Can You Tell If You Have a Brown Recluse Spider Bite?

    A: Within hours, brown recluse spider bites may cause severe pain and swelling, blisters with a red ring and blue center, itchy rashes, ulcerations or pimple-like contusions with green or yellow pus, advises Drugs.com. Other symptoms include joint pain, dark urine, fever, nausea, vomiting, seizures or chills.
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  • Q: What Are Some Good Tick Repellents for People?

    A: Off Deep Woods Sportsman II, 3M Ultrathon Insect Repellent and Cutter Backwoods Unscented are three effective insect repellent formulas, according to WebMD. These products are all between 20 and 30 percent DEET.
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  • What Symptoms Should I Check for After a Bug Bite?

    Q: What Symptoms Should I Check for After a Bug Bite?

    A: Individuals who have experienced a bug bite should check for symptoms such as hives or a rash; burning, numbness or pain; and red or purple spots developed on the skin, according to WebMD. Muscle spasms or muscle stiffness and difficulty breathing are also symptoms that should be evaluated.
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  • Q: What Does a Wolf Spider Bite Look Like?

    A: The site of a wolf spider bite is somewhat swollen and red. Upon closer inspection, puncture wounds or a tear mark are visible from the fangs. Rarely, some necrosis of the skin occurs around the bite. Necrotic tissue is discolored, soft and painful, and it emits a foul odor.
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  • Q: What Are Some Characteristics of Dog Bites?

    A: Characteristics of dog bites include pain near the bite site and visible teeth marks on the skin, explains The Hand Center of Western Massachusetts. Dog bites can also cause the skin to tear or bleed. An individual who has been bitten by a dog and notice warmth, redness, swelling and pain that lasts more than 24 hours needs an evaluation by a medical professional to determine if an infection exists.
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  • Q: Why Do Fleas Bite Humans?

    A: Fleas bite humans to obtain blood, their source of energy and nutrients, states the Illinois Department of Public Health. The human flea prefers humans and pigs, but humans are also bitten by other species of flea such as cat fleas and rat fleas. While different species of flea prefer to prey on different species, they can be easily transferred to other species in close proximity. In the United States, cat fleas bite humans the most often.
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  • What Is the Appropriate Treatment for a Spider Bite?

    Q: What Is the Appropriate Treatment for a Spider Bite?

    A: An appropriate treatment for a spider bite is the application of ice and an over-the-counter medication used to treat itching and redness. Elevating the area can also ease swelling associated with the bite, according to WebMD.
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  • Q: How Do You Treat a Deer Fly Bite?

    A: According to Real Simple, fly bites, including deer and horsefly bites, can be treated by washing the bite with soap and water and applying an ice compress to the bite for 15 minutes several times a day. Deer and horsefly bites can cause bleeding, and medical attention is recommended if the bleeding does not stop on its own.
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