Insect & Animal Bites

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Biting ants, or fire ants, leave red hive-like lesions that are distinct for their immense burning and itching, according to WebMD. In some cases, the lesions or blisters fill with puss and, in other cases, the bites create a life-threatening allergic reaction, according to WebMD. For the quickest relief, ice packs, pain relievers and antihistamines are commonly used to treat the pain and itching associated with ant bites, according to WebMD.

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  • Can flea bites make you sick?

    Q: Can flea bites make you sick?

    A: Fleas can carry infectious diseases from animals, and their bites can transfer these diseases to humans. The Public Health Department of Seattle and King County states that a flea bite does not necessarily mean a person will get sick, but some of the diseases fleas transmit can be deadly.
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  • How can scars from bug bites be lightened?

    Q: How can scars from bug bites be lightened?

    A: There are several ways to treat scars caused by bug bites, including the use of steroid injections, surgery, filler injections and laser resurfacing, according to WebMD. Most treatment options look at improving the look of the scar; no treatment can currently remove scars altogether.
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  • How long do flea bites last?

    Q: How long do flea bites last?

    A: According to FleaBites.net, bites from fleas typically require a few weeks to fully heal. The time it takes for flea bites to heal is heavily dependent on how sensitive a person is to them.
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  • Is there a disease caused by bedbugs?

    Q: Is there a disease caused by bedbugs?

    A: As of 2014, there is no evidence to prove that bedbug bites cause infections or disease themselves. It is suspected that they aid in the spread of infectious diseases, but this has not been proven. At worst a person scratching the bites makes himself more susceptible to infection by aggravating the wound sites and potentially introducing bacteria.
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  • Why do bug bites itch?

    Q: Why do bug bites itch?

    A: Bug bites itch because of a mild immune system reaction to bug saliva, according to the Mayo Clinic. When a bug bites someone it injects its saliva into the skin and the reaction in the body's immune system can result in an itchy bump.
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  • How long does it take for a flea bite to go away?

    Q: How long does it take for a flea bite to go away?

    A: The healing time for a flea bite varies widely based on the use of topical treatments and an individual's reaction to the bites, according to The Travel Doctor. Being able to recognize and treat flea bites as well as eliminate the pests from indoor environments can go a long way to shortening healing time and preventing bites in the future.
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  • What does an ant bite look like and how do you treat it?

    Q: What does an ant bite look like and how do you treat it?

    A: Biting ants, or fire ants, leave red hive-like lesions that are distinct for their immense burning and itching, according to WebMD. In some cases, the lesions or blisters fill with puss and, in other cases, the bites create a life-threatening allergic reaction, according to WebMD. For the quickest relief, ice packs, pain relievers and antihistamines are commonly used to treat the pain and itching associated with ant bites, according to WebMD.
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  • How do people get lice?

    Q: How do people get lice?

    A: According to the Center for Disease Control, head lice are spread by head-to-head contact with a person that is already infested. Such contact is common with children while they play at home, school or sporting events. Sharing clothing is another common method of spreading lice, especially hats, scarves, hair ribbons, barrettes, combs and brushes. Lice may also pass through the sharing of toys, such as stuffed animals.
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  • Can I get rabies from a rat bite?

    Q: Can I get rabies from a rat bite?

    A: According to the Centers for Disease Control, there are no known cases of rats transmitting rabies to humans. In fact, other small rodents, as well as rabbits and hares, do not seem to pass the disease along, observes the CDC.
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  • Where do ticks commonly hide on your body?

    Q: Where do ticks commonly hide on your body?

    A: According to naturalist Debbie Hadley for About.com, ticks are most commonly found in warm areas where they are able to easily hide, such as within the hair, behind the knees, between the legs, under the arms and sometimes in the belly button. Ticks hide on the body to keep warm and go undetected so they are able to feed for longer periods of time without being noticed.
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  • Q: How do you treat a person infected with Demodex mites?

    A: Demodex mites can be treated at home with daily application of tea tree oil shampoo, cream, and soap along with discarding makeup kits and contaminated bedding and clothes, according to Medscape. In the office, volatile fluids are applied to the affected area after a wash of .5 percent proparacaine.
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  • Q: What is a household remedy for hornet stings?

    A: Ice is the best treatment for hornet stings because they are deeper than bee or wasp stings, so the sting is harder to treat, states HomeRemediesForYou.com. Ice slows the spread of the venom as well as reduces swelling and pain.
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  • Q: How do you identify common bug bites?

    A: Insect bites initially cause pain and may then precipitate allergic reactions as venom deposited through the bite courses through the skin, explains Healthline. The intensity of the reaction varies from minor to life-threatening depending on the type of insect and the level of individual sensitivity to insect venom.
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  • Q: How do you get rid of dead lice and eggs in kids' hair?

    A: To remove dead lice and nits from a child's hair, a special tool called a nit comb is used, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Medical packages often feature nit combs alongside lice shampoo. When nit combs are unavailable, flea combs for household pets are also effective.
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  • Q: Is this a normal skin reaction to a tick bite?

    A: Many people have no skin reaction to tick bites, according to Healthline. An allergic skin reaction shows up as a rash or pain, swelling or blisters at the bite site, sometimes accompanied by trouble breathing. If the tick transmits a disease, serious symptoms often appear.
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  • Q: What is the best way to get rid of fruit flies?

    A: The best way to get rid of fruit flies is to put out a small amount of vinegar in a shallow pan or bowl. The flies are attracted to the vinegar and become trapped in the liquid.
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  • Q: How do you contract Lyme disease?

    A: Lyme disease a bacterial infection that is contracted from ticks, and humans most frequently contract it from deer tick bites. This condition is most common in Europe and North America, as stated by WebMD. It results from a bacterium referred to as Borrelia burgdorferi, which is commonly harbored by deer ticks. People living in wooded and grassy areas have a higher risk of getting the disease.
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  • Q: Do houseflies bite?

    A: According to Florida State University's Molecular Expressions Microscopy Primer, house flies have sponge-like mouth parts and cannot bite. Many other types of flies have piercing mouth parts including stable flies, who live on the blood of livestock, pets and people. Horse flies also may bite using scissor-like mouth parts.
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  • Q: Do snakes have feet?

    A: Snakes do not have feet or legs, but instead propel themselves forward using their ventral scales. Ventral scales are much like tire treads on a car, allowing the snake to grip.
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  • Is it bad to leave a tick head in your skin?

    Q: Is it bad to leave a tick head in your skin?

    A: According to Weston Pediatric Physicians, there is no additional danger if a tick is removed but the head remains in the skin. The head eventually falls out or falls apart without intervention. Any infections that pass from ticks to animals or humans are located in ticks' stomachs.
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  • Q: What do you do if a bug flies up your nose?

    A: When a bug is in the nose, it may be dislodged by pinching shut the unaffected nostril, according to WebMD, and blowing hard through the affected nostril a few times to try to clear out the insect. Otherwise, it may be necessary to visit a doctor.
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