Dental

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Adults cannot grow new teeth naturally. However, scientists have found a way to combine cells from adult human gums and cells from the molars of fetal mice to create bioengineered teeth.

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  • Why do my teeth hurt?

    Q: Why do my teeth hurt?

    A: According to the American Association of Endodontists, tooth pain can be a symptom of a wide variety of dental problems including decay, injury or infection. While mild sensitivity can be linked to receding gums and poses little harm, other dental pain can signify a more serious problem and requires a trip to the dentist for a diagnosis and treatment plan.
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  • Can you use a regular rubber band to close a gap between your teeth?

    Q: Can you use a regular rubber band to close a gap between your teeth?

    A: No. Attempting to close a teeth gap - also known as a dyastema - with a rubber band may lead to a temporary fix, but could also cause many eventual dental problems.
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  • How long will teeth hurt after a filling?

    Q: How long will teeth hurt after a filling?

    A: According to WebMD, any sensitivity from a filling should be gone within two to four weeks. If pain still exists after this period, WebMD recommends that patients consult their dentists.
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  • How many adult teeth are you supposed to have?

    Q: How many adult teeth are you supposed to have?

    A: According to the Encyclopaedia Britannica, humans have 32 permanent, or adult, teeth. The initial set of teeth in humans is called the primary or deciduous set and is made up of 20 teeth.
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  • What are front teeth partial dentures?

    Q: What are front teeth partial dentures?

    A: Front teeth partial dentures are removable dentures that consist of replacement teeth attached to a pink or gum-colored base, according to WebMD. Connected to the mouth by a metal plate framework, partial dentures are used when one or more of the natural front teeth are still in place on the upper or lower jaw.
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  • Why do toothaches hurt more at night?

    Q: Why do toothaches hurt more at night?

    A: Dr. John C. Stone, a cosmetic dentist of more than 30 years, explains that toothaches hurt more at night because of the increased blood pressure to the head that occurs when lying down. A persistent toothache causes a sharp, throbbing pain at irregular periods.
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  • How long does a toothache last?

    Q: How long does a toothache last?

    A: A toothache can cause severe pain indefinitely if it is not treated, according to the National Health Service of Britain. A toothache typically is caused by tooth decay and may progress to a dental abscess without treatment.
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  • How do you prevent dry mouth at night?

    Q: How do you prevent dry mouth at night?

    A: To prevent dry mouth at night, see a health care professional to determine the cause, and treat it accordingly. A room vaporizer can be used to add moisture to the air at night. Keeping water available by the bed when sleeping helps, as does staying hydrated throughout the day. To stimulate saliva flow, chew sugar-free gum, ice pops, ice chips or hard candies.
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  • Can a tooth infection make me sick?

    Q: Can a tooth infection make me sick?

    A: According to MedlinePlus, a tooth infection can make you sick. Such an infection can result in pus and swelling within the tooth and can spread, causing pain and destroying tissue. In addition to a severe toothache, other symptoms include fever, swollen neck glands and swelling of the upper or lower jaw. If an abscess goes untreated, it can lead to tooth loss, sepsis and life-threatening complications including endocarditis, pneumonia or brain abscess.
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  • What causes a wisdom tooth infection?

    Q: What causes a wisdom tooth infection?

    A: According to WebMD, pericoronitis occurs when the wisdom tooth partially erupts through the gums, allowing bacteria to enter the cavity and cause an infection. The high risk of wisdom tooth infection, or pericoronitis, may be one of the major reasons your dentist advises you to get them pulled.
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  • Can fake teeth be whitened?

    Q: Can fake teeth be whitened?

    A: Fake teeth cannot be whitened. However, unlike natural teeth, fake teeth do not stain from exposure to things such as coffee and tobacco. Fake teeth are created in a dental lab using either porcelain or acrylic resin. This material can be tinted to reach a desired shade.
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  • How do you control bleeding after a tooth extraction?

    Q: How do you control bleeding after a tooth extraction?

    A: By applying pressure to the site of the extraction and exercising basic wound care, most people are able to stop bleeding entirely within about 24 hours following a tooth extraction. WebMD recommends additional measures to manage bleeding, reduce the risk of infection and speed up the process of recovery. If symptoms persist for longer than 24 hours, it is advisable to report them to a doctor or the oral surgeon who performed the procedure.
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  • How long does it take for a loose tooth to fall out?

    Q: How long does it take for a loose tooth to fall out?

    A: When left alone, a loose tooth takes a few months to come out on its own. However, if a child wiggles a loose tooth, it comes out far more quickly.
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  • How long does dry socket pain last?

    Q: How long does dry socket pain last?

    A: Dry socket pain typically lasts for five to six days and is treated using over-the-counter pain relievers, according to WebMD. Typically appearing a couple days after having a tooth removed, a dry socket means that the blood clot formed in the hole where the removed tooth had been becomes dislodged. This leaves the sensitive nerves and bone inside the tooth exposed to food, fluids and air entering the mouth.
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  • Why is popcorn bad for braces?

    Q: Why is popcorn bad for braces?

    A: According to the University of Rochester Medical Center, patients with orthodontics need to avoid hard foods like popcorn because it can become lodged in the braces. Popcorn is even capable of breaking braces.
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  • Why does my tooth hurt when I drink something cold?

    Q: Why does my tooth hurt when I drink something cold?

    A: According to WebMD, tooth pain that occurs when ingesting cold beverages is referred to as tooth sensitivity, which occurs when tooth dentin is exposed. Exposed dentin is caused by gum recession, tooth grinding, over-aggressive brushing and acidic beverages.
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  • Where can I find dentists that accept Blue Cross Blue Shield?

    Q: Where can I find dentists that accept Blue Cross Blue Shield?

    A: Blue Cross Blue Shield provides an online national doctor and hospital finder on its website, which includes the ability to search for dentists, according to Blue Cross Blue Shield. This service conducts searches by proximity and by specialty, allowing users to find providers in the nearby community.
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  • Is fluoride bad for you when used on a daily basis?

    Q: Is fluoride bad for you when used on a daily basis?

    A: According to American Dental Association, children 8 years old and younger are at risk of developing dental fluorisis if too much fluoride is ingested. Dental fluorisis is a condition that causes white spots that eventually turn brown in unerupted and developing teeth.
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  • What are dentures made of?

    Q: What are dentures made of?

    A: Dentures are most often made from plastic or porcelain with an acrylic or plastic base, notes Tom Scheve for HowStuffWorks. The specific type of dentures an individual needs is mostly dependant on whether he has partial or full loss of his teeth.
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  • Why do my teeth hurt when I eat sweets?

    Q: Why do my teeth hurt when I eat sweets?

    A: According to the Crest Pro-Health website, tooth pain that occurs when eating sweets is a common symptom of lost tooth enamel, a condition that commonly occurs in individuals who consume excessive acidic beverages and foods as well as in individuals who brush their teeth too hard. When the top layer of enamel is worn down, tooth sensitivity and pain are common when consuming sweets and cold or hot beverages.
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  • How can soda rot your teeth?

    Q: How can soda rot your teeth?

    A: Everyday Health reports that both diet and sugar-sweetened soda damage teeth by exposing them to corrosive acids. Sodas contain citric and phosphoric acids. Both acids dissolve tooth enamel over time.
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